HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Electronics News

Slideshow: Engineering the Silver Screen

View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 5/6  >  >>
wbswenberg
User Rank
Gold
Re: The engineer as star
wbswenberg   11/15/2013 12:23:27 PM
NO RATINGS
Charles I wish you would have included the real person's photo.  Thanks for giving me two movies to watch.  I wish more movies to be like "October Sky"  Speaking of Oct "Red October" is another favorite.  This reminds me of my friend and past co-worker Kim.  He was into radio controlled model planes.  He said one of his models cost more than his car — $15K.  He built a square tunnel A/P and put in a piston powered fan.  There is a real A/P that is similar.  He lamented that it barely flew.  I'm an EE and don't know much about aerodynamics, even with 20 yrs. in aerospace, but I noticed there was no intake constriction nor nozzle.  We talked about an internal profile to speed up the flow.  He went to the NASA site and applied scaling factors to determine an internal profile he could do in 2D.  I believe he only did the sides and not the top or bottom.  He reported the A/P flew much better.  

So speed ahead ten years through 3 years out of work and I'm in B Flight Test and talking about turbofans.  Some have a solid axle — shaft that the fan, compressor and burner blades are attached too.  Please forgive me I'm sure I'm not using the correct terminology. One manufacture uses 3 separate coaxial shafts: one for the fan, one for the compressor, one for the burner.  How does that work?  Air as a working fluid.  The same way the A/P flies.  I had an epiphany. Note you can see the fan blades are serpentine for the different air flows.

jcsretired
User Rank
Silver
Real engineer in Hollywood
jcsretired   11/15/2013 12:12:53 PM

Would Fred McMurray's invention of Flubber count as chemical engineering?

Seriously, I'm sure there were dozens or hundreds of engineers working behind the silver screen to develop film, cameras, lighting and sound equipment, editing equipment, and so on.


And let us not forget Hedy Lamarr, a silver screen actress who also in real life co-invented spread spectrum communication!

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The engineer as star
Charles Murray   11/15/2013 10:00:12 AM
NO RATINGS
I felt the same way about The Aviator, notarboca. I was surprised that they focused so much on his efforts in aircraft engineering. I had assumed Hollywood would gloss over that aspect of his life, but they didn't.

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The engineer as star
GTOlover   11/15/2013 9:34:46 AM
As long as we are listing missing engineers, what about Howard Wolowitz? The aerospace engineer who would ruin a mars rover just to impress a girl! Although, that is not silver screen but television.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The engineer as star
Charles Murray   11/14/2013 9:36:03 PM
NO RATINGS
How could I forget Major Healy? Didn't the same actor also play a flight engineer on The Bob Newhart Show?

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The engineer as star
Rob Spiegel   11/14/2013 6:52:37 PM
NO RATINGS
That had to be one of your great meets, Rich. I take it you asked him whether he got the measles. Do you remember what else you asked him?

notarboca
User Rank
Gold
Re: The engineer as star
notarboca   11/14/2013 6:39:05 PM
NO RATINGS
I thought The Aviator was a well done movie.

richnass
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The engineer as star
richnass   11/14/2013 3:28:03 PM
NO RATINGS
This is a great topic. We could talk about it forever. I believe Major Healy (surely you're familiar with I Dream of Jeannie) was an engineer.

richnass
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The engineer as star
richnass   11/14/2013 3:26:53 PM
Chuck, you got the wrong guy from Apollo 13. The real hero was TK Mattingly, who devised the scheme to get the astronauts back to earth. I had the honor of meeting him a few years back (and no, he never did get the measles).

Jennifer Campbell
User Rank
Gold
Re: The engineer as star
Jennifer Campbell   11/14/2013 9:55:51 AM
NO RATINGS
Many great movies here. My favorite in the bunch was "Flash of Genius." The story really pulled me in, especially as Greg Kinnear's character slowly had a mental breakdown during his fight with Detroit automakers.

<<  <  Page 5/6  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Electronics News
The question of whether engineers could have foreseen the shortcut maintenance procedures that led to the crash of American Airlines Flight 191 in 1979 will probably linger for as long as there is an engineering profession.
More than 35 years later, the post-mortem on one of the country’s worst engineering disasters appears to be simple. A contractor asked for a change in an original design. The change was approved by engineers, later resulting in a mammoth structural collapse that killed 114 people and injured 216 more.
If you’re an embedded systems engineer whose analog capabilities are getting a little bit rusty, then you’ll want to take note of an upcoming Design News Continuing Education Center class, “Analog Design for the Digital World,” running Monday, Nov. 17 through Friday, Nov. 21.
It’s time once again for the Annual Design News Science and Engineering Movie Contest, which names no winners, awards no prizes, isn’t really a contest, and appears every three years or so.
Frank Langro of Festo Corp. describes how AquaJelly, the intelligent artificial jellyfish, works. Festo demonstrated AquaJelly at its booth at Pack Expo 2014 in Chicago this week.
Design News Webinar Series
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Dec 1 - 5, An Introduction to Embedded Software Architecture and Design
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service