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Slideshow: More Cars From the Small & Silver Screens

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Charles Murray
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More movie cars
Charles Murray   5/1/2014 7:07:55 PM
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More movie cars coming on Monday, including some from American Graffiti, Speed, Fast and Furious and National Lampoon's Vacation.

Charles Murray
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Re: The very best feature of any of them
Charles Murray   4/23/2014 7:00:47 PM
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Sounds very logical the way you describe it here, William K, but I wouldn't want to try it, even on a three-wheeler. It gives me a lot of respect for the movie tech people who do these magical stunts.

William K.
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Re: The very best feature of any of them
William K.   3/6/2014 9:27:09 PM
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Charles, it helps if the vehicle is a lighter 3-wheeler, and has fairly stiff tires. Probably on a regular car the tires would come off the rims, go flat, and make it really hard to handle. 

But with the three wheeler it is a whole lot like riding a bicycle, but keeping the frame at a weird angle. The trick to getting into that position without falling over is to enter it slowly. I am not sure that I would ever try it in a car, and certainly not in a normal car. But it should not be that challenging if one knew just what angle the balance would be at. The trick is to keep the CG right over the line between the wheels on the ground. Unfortunately the CG of a car can wander a bit relative to the wheels contact line. Not nearly as big a problem on a three-wheeler.

Charles Murray
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Re: The very best feature of any of them
Charles Murray   3/6/2014 7:31:26 PM
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The two-wheel trick has been used in a lot of movies. I recently saw it in the movie Twins -- Arnold Schwarzenegger does it for several seconds. I still can't figure out how that's done. You're the only person I know who's actually done it, William K.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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I missed this, the first time out
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   1/16/2014 11:13:40 AM
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Chuck, I can't believe I missed this last September; it just was re-featured in an UBM email of past highlights. What a great collection!! --and nice leverage from the earlier slideshow in June, including the earlier miss's. 

Oh, and My Mother, The Car-?  WOW what a blast from the past.  The forgotten fore-runner of KIP, the Knight-Rider (My Brother, the Car-?)

Really enjoyed that, Thanks!!


 

William K.
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Re: The very best feature of any of them
William K.   11/5/2013 9:16:40 PM
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I did sometimes wonder about how that car jumped so perfectly. It would take an adjustment of the CG to do that. The only stunt that I have duplicated, sort of, is the driving on two wheels. But that was on a three-wheel plant vehicle, not a regular car. It is a challenge no matter what one does it in.

Critic
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Re: The very best feature of any of them
Critic   11/5/2013 9:54:02 AM
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There was at least one scene where you can hear the passenger door, which was off camera, of the General Lee slam shut.  The actors didn't climb through the windows when they were off camera- they simply opened the doors.

About 300 cars were destroyed making the series.  The cars often didn't survive the jumps.  They placed up to 600 lbs of weight in the trunk for the jumps, to prevent the car from nose diving.

BrainiacV
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Re: Childhood memories
BrainiacV   10/22/2013 9:06:20 AM
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The Jaguar hearse was cool, unfortunately the only instance of it was destroyed in the last scene of the movie. :-(

Charles Murray
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Re: Childhood memories
Charles Murray   10/21/2013 6:14:03 PM
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Thanks, BrainiacV. Wow, that's one low-slung, racy-looking hearse. Looks like fodder the Movie Cars, Part 3.

BrainiacV
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Re: Childhood memories
BrainiacV   10/8/2013 10:41:40 AM
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Harold and Maude cars, Cadillac hearse and Jaguar hearse.

http://www.rostenbach.com/Hearse_Cadillac_Harold_and_Maude.jpg

http://www.rostenbach.com/Hearse_Jaguar_Harold_and_Maude.jpg

Screen shots from the movie.

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