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Electronic News & Comment
Slideshow: Top Medical Tech Engineering Innovations
3/30/2012

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Jesse Sullivan, a Tennessee power company lineman whose arms were amputated after he was electrocuted on the job, now has artificial limbs that let him rotate his wrists and upper arms, bend his elbow, grip with his hand, and, incredibly, feel. Sullivan's arm employs nerves from the chest muscle. When that muscle contracts, a myoelectric sensor atop his skin detects the contraction and sends it to an amplifier and then to a digital signal processor (DSP) in the Boston Digital Arm. The arm's DSP interprets the signal and then sends a command to the hand motor, which closes the hand. (Source: Liberating Technologies)
Jesse Sullivan, a Tennessee power company lineman whose arms were amputated after he was electrocuted on the job, now has artificial limbs that let him rotate his wrists and upper arms, bend his elbow, grip with his hand, and, incredibly, feel. Sullivan's arm employs nerves from the chest muscle. When that muscle contracts, a myoelectric sensor atop his skin detects the contraction and sends it to an amplifier and then to a digital signal processor (DSP) in the Boston Digital Arm. The armís DSP interprets the signal and then sends a command
to the hand motor, which closes the hand.
(Source: Liberating Technologies)

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Beth Stackpole
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Truly amazing stuff
Beth Stackpole   3/30/2012 7:17:48 AM
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Wow, what a great slide show, Chuck and what an impressive lineup of technology. I'm particularly struck by how far prosthesis have come with technical advances like robotics and sensors enabling the device to mimic real human movement and to tie into the nerves for natural dexerity. Amazing what engineers are accomplishing.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Blogger
Advancements to improve the human condition.
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   3/30/2012 12:35:58 PM

I remember when I first graduated college in the early 80's nearly all of my peers were taking jobs with major defense contractors.  The joke was, mechanical engineers made weapons.  Civil Engineers make Targets.  I really didn't like that joke and vowed to always work in industries where technology advancements improve the human condition.  After 30-some years, I admit I have spent some time in military contract work, but medical, automotive and communication have been my career.  Seeing these latest prosthetics validates my earliest career choice.  The Mechatronics interrelationship with human physiology and nervous system was once just a dream now being realized. Absolutely fantastic stuff.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Looks like sci-fi
Ann R. Thryft   3/30/2012 1:59:16 PM
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Great slideshow, Chuck. That first one reminds me of a Twilight Zone episode I saw as a kid, where the lead character discovers to his horror that he's actually an android by picking at what appears to be a scab or something on his wrist, and peeling up his "skin" to reveal electronics underneath. Here's a photo from that scene:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:In_His_Image(The_Twilight_Zone).jpg

 

apresher
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Top Medical Engineering Innovations
apresher   3/30/2012 6:15:03 PM
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Chuck, I'm impressed by the great diversity of technology ideas within the slide show. Clearly this is a rich area for engineering innovation.

Charles Murray
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Re: Looks like sci-fi
Charles Murray   3/30/2012 7:03:12 PM
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I actually remember that episode, Ann. This is the stuff of science fiction, isn't it?

Charles Murray
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Re: Truly amazing stuff
Charles Murray   3/30/2012 7:05:46 PM
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The engineer who created the arms that use human muscle and nerves to initiate movement was actually an Ph.D.-level engineer with a medical degree, Beth.

EEMEDIC
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Silver
EZ-IO
EEMEDIC   4/2/2012 9:37:53 AM
I have actually used the EZ-IO device on several patients in cardiac arrest. As an EE and a paramedic, I am always amazed at the engineering marvels that enable me to do a better job as a paramedic. I am amazed at how easy, fast, and effective it is to use. It can be tough getting an IV started on a patient in cardiac arrest, especially when they are wedged in some very tight awkward space (if there are other EMS providers out there, you KNOW what I am talking about)! When trying to do advanced skills like intubation, IV's, medications, defibrillation, etc in the field, it's not as easy as on a nice clean emergency room bed at just the right height with plenty of light and manpower. Every second counts in cardiac arrest and this device is simple and fast! It may be a little nerve racking the first time you use it to "drill" into someone's bone, but when you see positive results from it the first time, you really learn to love it! It allows a LOT more IV fluid to run than I ever thought it would, and I have given a medication, done a few compressions, and seen EKG changes in a matter of seconds!  EMS is becoming more advanced every day, and anything that makes the job easier and more effective is always appreciated!

Pbaker@IVy.eh
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Iron
Nice work Charles...
Pbaker@IVy.eh   4/2/2012 10:54:55 AM
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Nice show Charles.  I actually was fortunate enough to see Dr. Herr's keynote address at last year's Sensor Expo in Rosemount, IL.  In Ann's recent article on Robots in operating theatres I had thought of Dr. Herr.  Good to see him included in this.  And yes the comment about the Twilight Zone highlights the neccessity of a vibrant 'arts' community to foster ideas that may some day become reality by influencing & inspirinhg young minds to higher goals!! 

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Truly amazing stuff
Mydesign   4/3/2012 4:33:14 AM
Charles, now a day's medical electronics becomes more complex in terms of technology and nearer in terms of usability. In hospitals, most of the common medical procedures are replaced by black box devices, which can perform at a faster speed and accurate diagnosis.  I read that some research is going for artificial limbs, which are similar to biological limb having sensitivity.

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Truly amazing stuff
Mydesign   4/3/2012 4:36:56 AM
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1 saves
Charles, great. Thanks for sharing such innovative works. Whether any motion sensors are attached to the arm

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