HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Electronic News & Comment

Smartphones Pose More Danger to Drivers

NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 2 Next >
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/4  >  >>
Chuck Solid
User Rank
Bronze
Driving and "Smartphones" etc.
Chuck Solid   2/13/2012 2:52:07 AM
NO RATINGS
i would strongly disagree with the findings. Obviously dialling, texting, operating GPS units, or "lighting up a fag", are all extremely dangerous (and foolhardy) actions when you are supposed to be concentrating on your driving. But I have followed plenty of drivers who are merely carrying on a conversation with a phone to their ear,* and their driving is extremely erratic: speed variations, and "drifting" from one side of their lane to the other, seem to be the most common faults.

It beggars belief that our state of Victoria, (in Australia), has outlawed the use of hand-held phones in vehicles, yet it is ok to have GPS units**, car stereos with handheld remote controls, DVD players etc. (and cigarette lighters)

I'm not sure of the scientific reason, but there appears to be some sort of "proximity effect" when there are passengers in the car. They seem NOT to pose a major distraction for the driver.***

Having taken lessons in light aircraft, I found it quite comfortable talking to the Instructor while controlling the aircraft, and had no difficulty maintaining full concentration. It was a different matter when I had to make Radio calls. Maintaining control while trying to absorb instructions from a dis-embodied voice, and relaying information back to ground controllers required a much higher level of concentration.

If it were up to me, all electronic goods apart from the car stereo would be illegal in motor vehicles.

Chuck Solide

Melbourne, Australia

* Notwithstanding the fact that it is illegal !

** GPS units are merely contributing to the "Dumbing Down" of the population, are no substitute for the ability to "navigate", and have caused tragic deaths because they aren't always correct !

*** This does not apply to many ethnic groups (and individuals) who have the dangerous habit of turning to face their passengers to carry on their conversations, both orally and with hand gestures. (this is not racist comment, merely an observation, and I assume it has more to do with cultural influences than anything else)

 

 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: read the article in detail ...
Rob Spiegel   2/3/2012 1:37:48 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, kids are a major distraction, especially when you have a little one crying or older ones fighting. And you're right, that never gets mentioned. That's probably because it's an organic distraction and thus it can't be controlled in the same way that the use of cellphones and be restricted legally.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: read the article in detail ...
Charles Murray   2/2/2012 8:38:35 PM
NO RATINGS
Whenever distractions are discussed, kids are seldom mentioned. Truth be told, though, kids are probably the biggest possible distraction. Having them buckled into car seats definitely helps, but I always wonder how drivers managed in the 1950s, when kids weren't buckled and families were bigger. Can you imagine driving a car with six unbuckled kids in it? I'd consider jumping out the window.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: read the article in detail ...
Rob Spiegel   2/2/2012 11:42:57 AM
NO RATINGS
So consoles may be the new texting. I would think it is certainly worth looking into. Glad to hear that all aspects of driver distraction are included. Hope they include my favorite. Coming back from the store, I refilled a kid's tippy cup from a half gallon of milk while driving. I got pulled over for swerving. The cop let me off with the warning that I need to pull off the road when I refill the tippy cups.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: read the article in detail ...
Charles Murray   2/1/2012 7:52:05 PM
NO RATINGS
I believe we will hear more about this in the next year or so. The University of Iowa has a massive $60 million driving simulator in which they plan to test all kinds of driving distraction issues. I hope center consoles will be among their studies.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: read the article in detail ...
Rob Spiegel   1/31/2012 2:51:45 PM
NO RATINGS
That makes the dash electronics would become a problem if drivers are messing with them while driving. I haven't heard much about this distraction. All of the focus seems to be on texting and talking on cellphones. Any distraction could be dangerous.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: read the article in detail ...
Charles Murray   1/30/2012 7:32:50 PM
NO RATINGS
Rob: There's a breed of center consoles that has been evolving over the last few years that do a few things that dashboards generally didn't do seven or eight years ago. These new systems allow users to connect to devices that are brought in from outside (smartphones, iPods, GPS) and use them through the center console. They aren't new per se, but the distraction problem associated with them is growing more noticeable.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: read the article in detail ...
Charles Murray   1/30/2012 7:24:58 PM
NO RATINGS
In my opinion, Jack, the nested menus that you refer to are some of the worst offenders because they call on us to keep our eyes away from the road longer.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: read the article in detail ...
Rob Spiegel   1/30/2012 10:52:59 AM
NO RATINGS
I would guess these new dashboards would be a major distraction problem. It's not something I've heard anything about -- regarding safety. Is this type of super sophisticated dashboard brand new?

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: read the article in detail ...
Jack Rupert, PE   1/28/2012 3:47:05 PM
NO RATINGS
Even worse, Charles, is the fact that things are getting buried 2 or three levels deep.  I'm not talking about some setup type functions either.  These are things that used to be buttons on the dashboard.

Page 1/4  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Electronic News & Comment
Kevin Gautier of Formlabs describes the making of a carbon fiber mold for an intake manifold, using a $3,300 3D printer, during Medical Design & Manufacturing Midwest.
Mac Cameron of Stratasys describes the company’s Connex3 technology, which allows users to 3D-print complex parts in one build with no assembly required.
At Medical Design & Manufacturing Midwest, Joe Wascow told Design News how Optimal Design prototyped a machine that captures the wing-beat of a duck.
Melissa Cavanagh of 3DP Unlimited talked to Design News about the company’s large format 3D printer, during Medical Design and Manufacturing Midwest.
Eric Doster of iFixit talks about the most surprising aspect of the Microsoft Surface Pro 3 teardown. In a presentation at Medical Design & Manufacturing Midwest, iFixit gave the Surface Pro 3 a score of one (out of a possible 10) for repairability.
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service