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20 Engineers From the World of Sports

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Charles Murray
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Re: Sad, I only recognize three of these guys!
Charles Murray   7/28/2014 4:37:55 PM
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Admittedly, I didn't know most of the names beforehand, either, JimT. I still find some of the stories intriguing, though. In this batch, I was particularly intrigued by Bill Masterton, who actually worked as part of the Apollo space program in the '60s. I also found Charley Johnson's story unusual -- we didn't usually associate pro quarterbacks with Ph.D.'s in engineering.  

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: data analysis
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   7/28/2014 4:28:04 PM
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I agree with you, 100%.  A degree'd education is a necessary thing; even if it is only your 'Plan-B'  -- after a professional sports career.

600 pro baseball players in any one season (25 guys on 24 teams) , most will NOT become famous and rest on the laurels of their fame.  So, yeah, they've got to do something to earn a living, after The Show.

But I would not use the term 'failure' to describe an exit from professional sports.  These guys achieved something I tried and failed at, so they're winners in my book.

far911
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Re: data analysis
far911   7/28/2014 2:19:23 PM
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May b u r right. But my perception towards any reasonable degree along with a pro sports carrier is wise.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: data analysis
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   7/28/2014 2:12:07 PM
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"failure" is not the right word to describe many of their departures from professional sports.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Sad, I only recognize three of these guys!
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   7/28/2014 2:10:50 PM
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Sad on my part that I don't recognize any of these athletes; except Roger Staubach, Tom Landry and one guy I've actually met a few times, Joe Girardi.  Joe lived in the same town as me, while he was managing the Florida Marlins in 2006, and his kids went to the same school as mine; I had spoken with him a couple times at school events.  Soft-Spoken, and even-tempered, he is a true role-model of athleticism and intelligence.

 

far911
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Re: data analysis
far911   7/27/2014 3:02:16 AM
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Well stated mam, but i guess the sports field is very unpredictable so these personnels were sensible enough to secure their future with education subject 2 their failure in sports.

bobjengr
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ENGINEERS AND SPORTS
bobjengr   7/26/2014 2:35:35 PM
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Very interesting list.  I had no idea several of the individuals you indicated had engineering degrees.   They obviously chose as their profession their sport and not their chosen area of study.  After all, the big bucks are in athletics and not engineering.  It is commendable they did not take the easy way out but involved themselves with their academic passion.  During my university days I had an English class with a football player.  It was my sophomore year.  I'm almost embarrassed to say this but I unexpecidly discovered he was a gifted creative writer and broke the curve with his demonstrated ability.  He was far from the "average" athlete where I went to school.   The graduation rate at the University of Tennessee for athletes is pitiful, with one exception -- the ladies basketball team.  Their graduation rate is 95% plus.  

Charles Murray
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Re: data analysis
Charles Murray   7/25/2014 4:52:20 PM
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I agree with you, Nancy. It's tough enough making it through engineering, without adding the two-plus-hour-a-day ritual of practice, and the very time-consuming task of riding buses and airplanes to get to games. The people who can do both indeed desrve applause.

Charles Murray
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Re: Omission of Mark Donohue
Charles Murray   7/25/2014 4:49:24 PM
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Thanks for the heads-up on Mark Donohue, Bud B. Another of our commenters, TRC Sr, points out that we also missed NASCAR driver Ryan Newman. I suspect that we could do a whole slideshow on engineer/drivers.

Charles Murray
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Re: Dal Maxvill another Washington Univ. St. Louis EE Grad
Charles Murray   7/25/2014 4:41:44 PM
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Dal Maxvill is a great one, cmwiley2. I remember him playing shortstop for the Cardinals in the 1960s. It's interesting that Maxvill and Charley Johnson both studied engineering at Wash U during the off-seasons. Professional athletes weren't wealthy back then, and they needed to have a career outside of sports. I can't imagine that happening today.

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