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Engineering Disasters: Cracked Fitting Brings Down DC-10

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mr_bandit
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Iron
Engineering education
mr_bandit   11/28/2014 10:27:54 PM
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I have often advocated anybody in an engineering profession (including architecture) should first be a journeyman in the appropriate trades for 5 years before starting engineering school.

Even if one happens to be in an unrelated trade (ie caepenter, then areospace engineer), one would have a pretty good handle on the real world.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Sad memory, and what was learned.
tekochip   11/28/2014 10:42:39 AM
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I've done some research and haven't seen any repeat offenders, but then again the aircraft is 40 years old, maybe it'll take 40 years for the repairs to fail.

a.saji
User Rank
Silver
Re: Sad memory, and what was learned.
a.saji   11/28/2014 12:44:11 AM
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@tekochip: Does it happen regularly or is it a one-time thing ?

a.saji
User Rank
Silver
Re: Sad memory, and what was learned.
a.saji   11/27/2014 2:19:47 AM
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@tekochip: That's some valuable piece of information mate. I also feel that the price is mapped not for the size or the thickness, its for the output and its quality

LloydP
User Rank
Gold
Re: Sad memory
LloydP   11/26/2014 8:55:33 PM
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I have worked, as an engineer, with union and non-union shops throughout my career. (I am now retired) The rules of engagement in my experience depended on my relationship with the trades. I worked in a facility represented by the United Steelworkers Union where I could do almost anything, as long as a union tradesman was assigned to me. I worked in another USW plant where I could use a keyboard, or adjust anything that could be changed with a screwdriver that had a pocket clip. Anything more extensive required a tradesman to do the work under my instruction.

I worked in a UAW represented plant where I could do nothing other than instruct the tradesman what to do, one slow step at a time.

I worked in another plant of the same company, in the same town, where I could do almost anything, as long as the appropriate tradesman was nearby. We even joked about it. My job was to trick them into doing work for me. Their job was to trick me into doing something that they could file a grievance. They never did, because I had a good relation with the trades, and we both understood the rules. Most of the time, at that plant, the trades were eager to work with me, because I was willing to explain what we were doing, and why.

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Was There a Real Root Cause?
bobjengr   11/25/2014 5:58:34 PM
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Wayne--I know the feeling.  I graduated in 1961 and took my commission as a second Lieutenant then assigned to the Air Force Logistics Command. The group I was in supported the Titan II ICBM, specifically the thrust chamber and turbopump assemblies.  I went through the training program during the months of January and February then went TDY to Davis-Monthan AFB the first of March.  Cracked rotor blades on turbopump rotors.  (Going was not my idea at all.) It was excellent experience but I was a bundle of nerves during the entire two weeks of the investigation.  Really nervous when I gave a report out the commanding officer.  Those two weeks was worth more than reading all of the manuals available but it was sink or swim.  

Excellent post Charles.    

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Sad memory, and what was learned.
tekochip   11/24/2014 7:25:00 PM
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Bob , no, not on the stab.  I've seen guys do it, and thought it was too easy to dent the skin if you missed the ribs.  I used to move the plane around by pushing down on the former near the vertical stabilizer, but my wallet changed that behavior when I wore out a new pair of Goodyears on the mains.  Those tires may be small but they sure are pricey.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Sad memory, and what was learned.
tekochip   11/24/2014 7:14:45 PM
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ab3a, yes, it was during the annual, and is part of the normal inspection.  The cracks were exactly like all the ones you see on the web, sitting at about 10 o'clock and 4 o'clock.  There wasn't any buckling yet.

wbswenberg
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Sad memory
wbswenberg   11/24/2014 7:12:35 PM
I had joined the B compnay in 77.  We talked aout the failure alot.  One of the things I have found out in my 37 years of expeience is that the airlines will use and maintain the airplane as they damn well please.  Hopefully thier internal procedures are close to the manufacturers procedures.  

Daniel I
User Rank
Iron
Re: Sad memory
Daniel I   11/24/2014 6:43:42 PM
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no need to politicise a very sad event by mentioning unionisation. i am sure in the days of those 'dark satanic mills' - pre-unionisation - there were equally sad deaths. the issue of engineers not understanding shop floor requirements has more to do with the ways engineers are being trained than anything to do with unionisation.

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