HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
CAD/CAM Corner
3D Printing With Sugar
6/5/2013

Image 1 of 3      Next >

 (Source: The Sugar Lab)

(Source: The Sugar Lab)

Image 1 of 3      Next >

Return to Article

View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/5  >  >>
andrewj777
User Rank
Iron
Re: How does it work?
andrewj777   6/6/2013 9:22:26 AM
NO RATINGS
It's been done before! http://www.evilmadscientist.com/2007/solid-freeform-fabrication-diy-on-the-cheap-and-made-of-pure-sugar/

In the ancient days of 2007 it was done. In 2009 they came out with a new version. I think they have plans to build your own.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
not new and not interesting
NadineJ   6/6/2013 9:40:05 AM
I think this is one of the least interesting applications for 3D printing covered here...and, there have been several covered here.

Making more fun stuff from food is not innovation.  IMHO, it's wasteful. 

3drob
User Rank
Platinum
Brilliant
3drob   6/6/2013 9:52:19 AM
NO RATINGS
Finally, 3D printed objects I can really sink my teeth into.

Cake icing seems more manageable as an edible printing material (more like the meltable plastic string).  I would think chocolate would take too long to solidify (although you could print molds for it with a regular plastic printer).  I'd love to see a picture of their printer to get a better idea of the technology.

But (unfortunately) if they print customer's models, i couldn't see it on their web site (but sometimes internet doesn't work so well where I am).

Zippy
User Rank
Platinum
Re: How does it work?
Zippy   6/6/2013 10:24:29 AM
NO RATINGS
I smiled a little at the repeated warnings that sugar melts in water and under heat.  Is the assumption that engineers don't know the properties of common cooking ingredients?  Note:  Unless you work for the design firm of Hansel & Gretel and build gingerbread houses for wicked witches, DO NOT use sugar in load-bearing structures!  :)

namarena
User Rank
Iron
Sugar melt temperature
namarena   6/6/2013 12:52:45 PM
NO RATINGS
Very interesting, but sucrose (plain sugar) melts at 366.8 deg F not 150 F. Just to keep things straight.

Watashi
User Rank
Platinum
Thanks a lot Cabe
Watashi   6/6/2013 1:42:51 PM
NO RATINGS
Are you trying to kill 3D printing!!!  First you write about printing guns and now sugar!  A certain mayor of NYC is going to ban 3D printers as weapons of mass destruction!

But seriously, my hardy best wishes to the couple.  I hope they profit handsomely from their ingenuity.  It is a very inspiring story. 

...And it may be just the hook I need to get my wife on board with me buying a 3D printer.

mr_bandit
User Rank
Iron
hive76
mr_bandit   6/6/2013 7:28:33 PM
NO RATINGS
The Philly hackerspace hive76 did this a year ago:

http://www.hive76.org/how-to-innovate-in-science-with-open-source-technology

http://www.hive76.org/leaders-of-the-3d-printing-revolution

A biochemist was looking for a way to print blood vessels to make kidneys. He went to hive76 to see if they can print in sugar - they figured it out.

So - old news - a hackerspace beat them to it.

- quote -

One of our core members, Jordan Miller, has just published a scientific paper using RepRap 3D printing technology to engineer living tissues for regenerative medicine. I'll give you a rundown of the science and a step-by-step guide of how Jordan got to this great spot in his career. Jordan is quick to point out that this is work that would not have been possible 5 years ago, or without the help of RepRap, Hive76, and this wonderful city of Philadelphia.

http://www.twitter.com/jmil

http://www.reprap.org/

 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Edible Desserts, etc.
Charles Murray   6/6/2013 7:48:23 PM
NO RATINGS
You're right, OldCurmudgeon. Bakeries have offered edible flowers on cakes for decades.

mr_bandit
User Rank
Iron
Re: hive76
mr_bandit   6/6/2013 7:50:42 PM
NO RATINGS
I forgot to mention that  the hive76 process is *fully open-source*, unlike what this couple is doing. Following the link: (quote)

Here's a step-by-step of Jordan's many year process:
  1. Get a crazy idea to link sugar and vasculature when comparing the interior of a 3D print to a capillary network.
  2. Get a PhD in bioengineering
  3. Move to Philadelphia
  4. Join a hackerspace
  5. Get introduced to 3D printing, MakerBot and RepRap
  6. Assemble your first MakerBot
  7. Invent a heated build platform to dry your sugar while printing.
  8. Add a heater to the Frostruder so you can print molten sugar.
  9. Assemble a customized RepRap Mendel that fits your new extruder.
  10. Get help from your hackerspace to properly control your pneumatic extrusion.
  11. Work for months perfecting recipes and methods for printing vasculature.
  12. Write it all up in a research paper and submit!

You can read the Penn press release about this awesome science, an overview from Science News, or the full paper. A more detailed post about the hardware used in this project will follow and soon you'll be able to make your own sugar extruder. (It prints chocolate too!)

apresher
User Rank
Blogger
3D Printing with Sugar
apresher   6/6/2013 8:36:37 PM
NO RATINGS
Definitely some commercial opportunities combining interesting designs and sugar.  Would think there are many ways this could be used.  Good story.

<<  <  Page 2/5  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from CAD/CAM Corner
Virtual Reality (VR) headsets are getting ready to explode onto the market and it appears all the heavy tech companies are trying to out-develop one another with better features than their competition. Fledgling start-up Vrvana has joined the fray.
A Tokyo company, Miraisens Inc., has unveiled a device that allows users to move virtual 3D objects around and "feel" them via a vibration sensor. The device has many applications within the gaming, medical, and 3D-printing industries.
While every company might have their own solution for PLM, Aras Innovator 10 intends to make PLM easier for all company sizes through its customization. The program is also not resource intensive, which allows it to be appropriated for any use. Some have even linked it to the Raspberry Pi.
solidThinking updated its Inspire program with a multitude of features to expedite the conception and prototype process. The latest version lets users blend design with engineering and manufacturing constraints to produce the cheapest, most efficient design before production.
XYZ, Rabbit, and Disney innovate on the 3d printer in different ways -- from price point to using materials such as yarn.
Design News Webinar Series
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Dec 15 - 19, An Introduction to Web Application Security
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service