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Formlabs Launches 'Prosumer' 3D Printer

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morgancooper
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Iron
this is future
morgancooper   10/4/2012 9:54:14 AM
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WOW, 3D printer, I wonder how the prints will look like. DO we have to use 3D goggles to see them? I wonder I will soon owe one of these. Propolis

naperlou
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Star Trek
naperlou   10/4/2012 10:27:15 AM
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Beth, a lot of science fiction shows had a replicator device on board the space ship.  I think Stat Trek had one.  This is very similar.  If you need a part, don't stock it, just print it on demand. 

Beth Stackpole
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Re: Star Trek
Beth Stackpole   10/4/2012 11:07:59 AM
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That's certainly the goal, Naperlou, athough not there yet. This printer is interesting because it fits in that low-cost enough category that folks might buy one for home, but yet seems to have more of the robust capabilities for designing parts and models on a professional grade. Also, has some pretty impressive backing, including Mitch Kapor who was the original guy behind Lotus 1-2-3, the program that took PC spreadsheets to the mainstream.

Charles Murray
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Re: Star Trek
Charles Murray   10/4/2012 8:45:04 PM
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Beth, is anyone else in the 3D printer market using stereolithography? Seems to me I heard a lot about stereolithography about 15 years ago. Are others using this technology?

jainirrigation
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Iron
3d printing
jainirrigation   10/5/2012 4:47:06 AM
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Can any one tell me what is the exact difference between rapid prototying machines and a 3D printer? we are already using RPT machines for making new products and the materials which we are using mostly are somos resin or duraform. is 3d printing is advanced than RPT? 

Beth Stackpole
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Re: 3d printing
Beth Stackpole   10/5/2012 6:43:40 AM
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I think the biggest difference, from what can see, is the scale and scope. Traditionally, rapid prototyping machines have been huge and highly complex, often run as a bureau within a company with their own staff. Materials choices and production methods are also different and we're talking really expensive--hundreds of thousands of dollars.

In contrast, 3D printing is typically the term used for the lower cost, more office friendly systems that employ a more limited choice of materials and are geared more towards the fast output of designs for validation and optimization, not necessary for production-ready models.

rick oleson
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Gold
Re: 3d printing
rick oleson   10/5/2012 9:34:30 AM
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The idea of a 3D printer / rapid prototype machine (the difference is purely semantic in my view) in my home is an exciting development that I'm looking forward to.... but I'm not at all sure that handling liquid resins is something that I want to do in my home office.  At work, I've gone with the Stratasys FDM system, which doesn't achieve this level of fine detail but does use real ABS material and is completely clean in operation.  We use this machine in the office, and shop out work that requires a messier process.  To have a machine in my home, it would have to be clean and not present materials disposal challenges.

Weldon
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Re: 3d printing
Weldon   10/5/2012 10:39:28 AM
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What is presently being viewed as a "reasonable price" for one of these printers that will allow it to be purchased by engineering firms?  $10K?   100K?

swed
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Iron
3D printers.
swed   10/5/2012 10:53:58 AM
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There are a dozen 3d printers on the market, MakerBot is the latest high volume, sub $2500.00 range.  Desk top printers range from $250K for a 4 media 12" by 12" by 9 " machine to the Makerbot machine. This is a welcome entry, the resolution is acceptable at 1 mil. A search of 3D printers returns amazing ranges of hardware, check out Maker Faire. ObJet has the most impressive bang fort the Buck, 4 color, soft molding for outer bumper, under $250K.  The field is opening up to be the next Apple quickly.

btwolfe
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Re: 3d printing
btwolfe   10/5/2012 10:54:47 AM
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Weldon, Formlabs hasn't offered a price yet. They do suggest a price for the materials, at $149/liter. Depending on the solid volume of your part, you might get somewhere between 1 and 50 parts per liter. I suspect the printer will be in the $5K-$10K range, based on my experience as a robotics system mfg. Prices may be lower, given that Kickstarter is funding their IP development so they don't have to recoup those costs.


I haven't donated yet, but intend to. If they do their job right, they're going to crush the 3D printer industry.

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