HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
CAD/CAM Corner

3D-Printed Weapons & the Consequences

NO RATINGS
2 saves
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 5/12  >  >>
jeffbiss
User Rank
Gold
not irrelevant
jeffbiss   12/12/2012 4:34:20 PM
Wow, now that's a lot of attitude! I do feel sorry for those 250 engineers you know though. You could have ignored this of course, but no, you couldn't. You had to throw your 2 cents in to let everyone know just how right-wing you are, never to miss just such an opportunity. Besides, this is an issue for engineers to discuss just as was the nuclear bomb for physicists. Enjoy!

D. Sherman
User Rank
Silver
Yet another article asking the wrong question
D. Sherman   12/12/2012 4:49:41 PM
I'm rather dismayed to see the wrong fear-mongering question again being asked in one of our trade magazines. If we're going to write about 3D-printed guns, the question should be how to make new and innovative guns, not whether or not someone could make one for evil purposes. We can read about a new drug in terms of its benefits, without any mention of how someone could use it for criminal purposes. We can read about a new rocket motor without any mention of someone using it for a ballistic missile. We can read about a new metal alloy without worring that someone is going to use it to make a deadlier knife. And we can certainly read about all kinds of software innovations without any discussion of how someone could use them for criminal purposes. For that matter, people could (and sometimes do) use plain old 2D printers to commit fraud and forgery.


So how about Design News sending a reporter to a legitimate firearms company and interviewing the engineers there about how they are using 3D printers? I can think of two main applications. One is to produce non-firing prototypes to check fit and finish and fine-tune ease of assembly. The other is to produce PARTS for weapons in production. The AR15 platform seems to be the most popular for home builders.

Most of the receivier of any gun, but particularly an AR15, is subject to fairly low stress, and yet it has a complicated shape. In any gun, the chamber, the bolt, and the bolt lugs are the high-stress parts. Most of the rest is just a jig to hold the trigger assembly, stock, and magazine in position. A reasonable approach would be to machine or forge a piece of metal, of fairly simple shape, to carry the ~50,000 psi stresses of firing, while using 3D printed high-strength plastic to hold that and the other low-stress parts together. 

An article focusing on how to optimally combine 3D printing with traditional metal manufacturing processes would also be far more useful to us real engineers than another round of hand-wringing about "what if criminals print guns?"

jeffbiss
User Rank
Gold
I think we n handle the topic
jeffbiss   12/12/2012 5:07:37 PM
Everything, including new technologies, has unintended consequences. In light of our violent culture, it seems that discussing the ease of weapon manufacture is relevant just as is software development with regards to identity theft and that 2D printing technology you mentioned for counterfeiting. We can handle these seemingly peripheral topics as they are a consequence of the underlying technology.

Watashi
User Rank
Platinum
Re: It's not the guns, Stupid.
Watashi   12/12/2012 5:51:16 PM
NO RATINGS
I beleive you are referring to Switzerland.

Watashi
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Much ado about something
Watashi   12/12/2012 6:02:05 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the article, it's a fun diversion to read the comments on these "red meat" subjects.

I would be interested in seeing the cost comparison between additive methods vs. other manufacture methods for the firearms industry.  It would also be interesting to see how close state of the art 3D printing is to being a viable part of the industry and how close it is to being able to produce the stressed parts.  Metal deposition is already being used in aerospace structural elements for fighter jets; but that customer base has deep pockets.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: I think we n handle the topic
Charles Murray   12/12/2012 6:56:27 PM
Great article, Cabe. As jeffbiss accurately points out here, it's important to be able discuss the consequences of the underlying technology.  

Constitution_man
User Rank
Gold
Re: not irrelevant
Constitution_man   12/12/2012 9:45:29 PM
Wow...  now someone feels sorry for me and my peers... I don't get it, but OK.  The assumption that we "right-wing" types don't engage in broader discussion is just as inane as the assumption that the original article is worth the space it occupied on the cloud.  Y'see... my friends and I are not about to lose one breath of sleep over the things that make the spineless jellyfish among the unarmed or otherwise defenseless populace squirm.  Quite the opposite.  As thinking men and women, as educated men and women, and as realistic men and women we routinely revel in the freedoms we claim as Americans and laud the creative application of all kinds of technology to the enjoyment and benefit of all.  This is what engineering and design is all about.  And, as the needle deflects from professional-level creativity to trade-level hands-on application, it is pure rubbish to ask that fine folks within our government protect us from ourselves.  Quite honestly we are more than capable of doing so without much assistance, especially if we are not stripped of the freedom that allows us to do so.  Attitude?  Yes, absolutely.  I am proud to be an American, proud to be as self-sufficient as I can be, and proud to live with little or no fear.  How can one possibly live in this great land of ours without some "attitude"?  But it's a good and wholesome attitude.  I refuse to become part of the hysterical set that demands that EVERYONE stripped down to a cell phone and a home alarm system as self-defense mechanisms.   Too slow, too ineffective, and too late.  And, quite frankly... the attitude embodied in the original article is far more bothersome to freedom-loving Americans than ANY of its opposition so well-expressed by those who took the time to express their valuable counter-arguments.   Enjoy??  indeed.  Bring it.  I LOVE a good debate.

redandgearhead
User Rank
Silver
Re: much ado about nothing
redandgearhead   12/12/2012 10:37:41 PM
 

I'm not sure selling a weapon you make is a problem.  Unless the weapon leaves the state you live in.  There are more than one groups of people who have thought of manufacturing weapons in Texas.  There are some thinking of making 100 watt incandescent light bulbs.  There is no problem till the articles cross the start line and come under Federal jurisdiction.

My thought was to use the printer to make prototypes for casting molds

I think this article is a bit hysterical.

"Move along. Move along. There is nothing here to see. Move along.

gleaf
User Rank
Iron
3D printer firearm?
gleaf   12/13/2012 6:55:34 AM
NO RATINGS
There is a far far differance in tolerance and performance between 'reciever' and the more stressed portions such as chamber and barrel.

The writer appears quite imagintive as to the consiquences of 3 D printer what is mostly a non precision stamped metal parts collection with a spring.

jeffbiss
User Rank
Gold
Not you, those you know
jeffbiss   12/13/2012 9:55:16 AM
I don't feel sorry for you but those you know. You didn't comprehend my post so of course you don't get it. What was that diatribe about? First you don't want to talk about the implications of the 3D printing of guns and then you spill your guts about what you believe, which is nothing but singing the praises of your "freedom" (whatever that means) loving, and more important, tough self. Wow! You're not afraid! Thanks for letting us know.

The fact is that guns don't guarantee "freedom" (whatever that means), culture does. This article is not a wate of time as it forces a discussion of things that are a consequence of engineering and are thus part of engineering. Of course you could "debate", but you haven't. All you've done is belly ache about you.

<<  <  Page 5/12  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from CAD/CAM Corner
IBM announced it is dedicating $3 billion of funding over the next five years to research and development of new processor technologies.
Micro Python is priming the presses. After smashing its Kickstarter campaign, the programming platform is almost ready to release its Micro Python boards into the public market.
Theorem Solutions recently announced the release of its newest software solution: Publish 3D. The program enables direct translation between CAD software and the PDF format, allowing engineers to spend more of their time doing what they do best -- creating.
University of Houston researchers created DermoScreen, an app that can detect skin cancer via a smartphone.
The MOD-t 3D printer, from New Matter, is a low-cost printer that is easy to use and one of the cheapest yet. Cookie Caster lets a user design his or her own cookie cutters and have them made. It's the cloud at work!
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 4 - 8, Introduction to Linux Device Drivers
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: August 12 - 14
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service