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Staples & Mcor Team Up to Bring High-Quality 3D Printing to the Masses
1/11/2013

A 3D-printed skull showing a stunning example of multicolor 3D resin printing. Quality at this scale will be available to anyone at their local Staples office supply store starting this year.   (Source: Mcor Technologies)
A 3D-printed skull showing a stunning example of multicolor 3D resin printing. Quality at this scale will be available to anyone at their local Staples office supply store starting this year.
(Source: Mcor Technologies)

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Cabe Atwell
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Re: Applications and availability
Cabe Atwell   1/14/2013 5:06:21 PM
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A colleague of mine has to work with an expensive, but small, 3D printer. He hates having to deal with it. There is so many steps to run and maintenance procedures that he admitted to me saying, "I think about breaking the printer all the time. But I know I would be the one that has to fix it."

3D printing is not always rainbows and sunshine for manufacturers.

Having Stapes handle the job, by all means... please.

C

TJ McDermott
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Re: Applications and availability
TJ McDermott   1/13/2013 8:42:27 PM
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CADMAN LT

I expect this will actually be pretty simple to run.  Certainly, less training would be needed than that of handing an FEA package to a drafter and expect them to be competent as a stress analysist in the same amount of time.

I'd expect operation would entail importing the customer's file, verify that it's usable and fits within the fabrication volume, and then yes, hit print.

Tim
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Good idea
Tim   1/13/2013 7:57:47 PM
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This is a great idea. It puts the possibility of prototyping just down the street for companies that might not be able afford it otherwise. I wonder about the available tolerances and if the end products would be close enough to use for contour tracing for fixture design.

Cadman-LT
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Re: Applications and availability
Cadman-LT   1/12/2013 10:12:26 AM
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Not even so much as the material, which could be a drawback. I just wonder if they would hire people capable of running the new equipment...it isn't like hitting copy on a copy machine.

Cadman-LT
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Re: Applications and availability
Cadman-LT   1/12/2013 10:09:26 AM
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Great article. I always like reading about anything new with 3D printing. I have my doubts about this working out though. 

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Applications and availability
Cabe Atwell   1/11/2013 5:14:04 PM
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Eafpres,

Thanks for catching that. I was comparing other printers with a similar resolution and quality to the Mcor. Resin printers like the Form1 from Formlabs came to mind.

The Mcor is an interesting option. I use this plastic material called Garolite in projects. It is a paper laminate. Great for anything that requires strength that is non conductive. Not great on machine tool life. The US military used Garolite in a lot of their gear, for the record. So, if the Mcor can create a similar material, I can see it used in a lot of applications.

C

eafpres
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Applications and availability
eafpres   1/11/2013 1:12:21 PM
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Nice update.  Ann pointed it out to me as I was asking in another forum if there was forthcoming coverage of the IRIS system.  I have looked at their website and viewed the videos; there is some confusion for me still as some videos show a person tediously picking off unwanted bits revealing the 3D model; other videos have them saying the part comes out finished.  Perhaps their technology is evolving fast.  I'm confused too on the resin comments; perhaps that comes from the adhesive or pigment, but the base material is definitely standard paper.

A couple ideas for you for further research and blogs: consider applications that are enabled by these technologies.  On their site, mcor shows a case study where they used 3D ultra-sound data to make models of babies so parents can get an even more realistic view than looking at the images on a screen.  I mentioned to Ann that these models may be nearly perfect as the first step to make sand molds for metal casting; we were talking about another DN post on Ford's use of 3D printing and casting.  I think the enablement line of thought is very powerful; the 3D technology is "cool" but it is what it opens up that is really exciting for design.

I though I would also say that FedEx Office is in a good position to support mass adoption since they could print models and ship them same day, offering a vertically integrated solution!

Ann R. Thryft
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Which printer?
Ann R. Thryft   1/11/2013 11:35:53 AM
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Cabe, according to Beth's earlier Design News article on Mcor
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1394&doc_id=238107
their Matrix 300 3D printer uses paper, not resin. Your article here mentions the Mcor Iris printer printing paper. Is a different Mcor printer's output shown in the photo? The caption says resin.

JulieReece
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More
JulieReece   1/11/2013 6:41:34 AM
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Cabe,  I also want to correct the materials...Mcor doesn't use resin.  The material is standard office letter or A4 paper and the process involves paper, cutting with a Tungsten tip blade, water-based adhesive.

JulieReece
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Iron
Corrections
JulieReece   1/11/2013 5:58:17 AM
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Hi Cabe, 

Thank you for the great article! Just a few corrections. Mcor's paper 3D printing technology is quite different from the old laminated object manufacturing (please see my blog post on the subject :http://www.mcortechnologies.com/paper-3d-printing-its-not-your-daddys-lom/).  Also Formlabs technology is completely different than Mcor's in every aspect and is a hobbyist printer.

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