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NASA 3D-Printed Rocket Engine Is Ready
7/31/2013

NASA and Aerojet Rocketdyne created a 3D-printed rocket engine using fused deposition modeling and stereolithography.  (Source: NASA)
NASA and Aerojet Rocketdyne created a 3D-printed rocket engine using fused deposition modeling and stereolithography.
(Source: NASA)

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vimalkumarp
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Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
vimalkumarp   8/7/2013 7:55:04 AM
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Yes , i understand what you mean. Sometimes innovations do need some push to gather momentum and there is nothing better than support from NASA.

Elizabeth M
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Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
Elizabeth M   8/7/2013 7:49:24 AM
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3D printing already is taking off in so many ways, that I imagine NASA will just give it more of a boost(er). Sorry, I couldn't resist the pun opportunities! :)

vimalkumarp
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Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
vimalkumarp   8/7/2013 1:23:34 AM
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Yes Elizabeth, you are spot on with the observation that NASA's investment in it will set a good precedent.

Elizabeth M
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Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
Elizabeth M   8/6/2013 9:27:58 AM
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Exactly, vimalkumarp, and NASA's investment in it will set a good precedent and hopefully inspire the commercial sector.

vimalkumarp
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Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
vimalkumarp   8/1/2013 9:42:51 AM
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Your point that NASA has had a hand in developing a lot of technologies that benefit the world, not just the space agency is spot on. I am sure 3D printing has a bright future..

Elizabeth M
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Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
Elizabeth M   8/1/2013 8:07:32 AM
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Indeed, vimalkumarp, NASA has had a hand in developing a lot of technologies that benefit the world, not just the space agency. With NASA innovating this way it makes sense that commercial technology will follow suit. This really holds a lot of promise for the rapid evolution of 3D printing, I think.

vimalkumarp
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Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
vimalkumarp   8/1/2013 2:22:00 AM
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it is incredible that a rocket engine was fabricated this way.  the most important point that i feel is that if you analyse the technology evolution, space technology has always been a pioneer. So any advancement in space will cause ripples in other domain and this is good for having solutions that will enhance quality of life. Thanks a lot Cabe for the blog.

a.saji
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Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
a.saji   7/31/2013 10:47:43 PM
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@Shehan: Indeed and that shows the development of the technology itself. The technology has come a long way and the signs of improvement are visible now.

78RPM
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Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
78RPM   7/31/2013 10:36:50 PM
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Oh, shehan, I meant to direct my previous comment to you.

78RPM
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Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
78RPM   7/31/2013 10:34:11 PM
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Yes, Elizabeth. My Montana kitchen imitates a time when someone just mixed a bunch of blue minerals (chromium ?) to get a color to add to the whitewash/lime. But, yes we have gone beyond Pantone color match at the hardware store to get to other world / artificial reality.  I like your comment because it is close to home.

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