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CAD/CAM Corner
3D Printers' Role Fueled by Content Tools
6/29/2012

Now 123D Catch lets users take images from an iPad camera, upload them to the Autodesk cloud, and transform them into a 3D model.
Now 123D Catch lets users take images from an iPad camera, upload them to the Autodesk
cloud, and transform them into a 3D model.

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Cadman-LT
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Re: It's catchy
Cadman-LT   8/2/2012 12:54:48 PM
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Ahh, ok. I would imagine they can. This is everywhere now. Everyone wants a piece of it or is using it. It'll be neat to see it in a few years.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: It's catchy
Ann R. Thryft   7/9/2012 12:34:24 PM
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Having done some sculpting in clay years ago, I'd say that sounds like an interesting idea for an artist's tool.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: It's catchy
Ann R. Thryft   7/5/2012 1:48:08 PM
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Yes. I spelled out everything because you asked several questions and because I wonder if existing non-3D materials already developed for this application could be adapted for 3D printing.

Cadman-LT
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Re: It's catchy
Cadman-LT   7/5/2012 1:34:34 PM
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I thought that that was exactly what I was saying. You want a printable substance that resembles wood, marble, etc. Yes?

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: It's catchy
Ann R. Thryft   7/5/2012 12:56:41 PM
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Cadman-LT, the materials for making marble replicas look like marble, and stone like stone, etc. already exist. They were used for decades to make replicas--but not used in 3D printers. So I'm wondering whether it's possible to invent new materials like those for this purpose that can be used in 3D printers. Two reasons for wondering this: a) the older, more authentic looking and feeling materials that produced medium-range-priced statues, etc. are no longer in favor. Instead, much of what I've seen are made with resins that produce cheaper replicas with finer surface detail, but with a Barbie doll feel. b) 3D printers do such a good job of replicating detail quickly and are becoming less expensive all the time. a) is the problem, b) might be a solution.

Cadman-LT
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Re: It's catchy
Cadman-LT   7/4/2012 6:18:13 AM
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Now this isn't for replicas, but it would be good for sculptors. If they had a 3d medium to work in, maybe like a 3d hologram. They could have haptic feedback so it feels like clay(or whatever medium) and sculpt the hologram. Then just export that to a file nd print it out to a 3d printer. It's years away, but I bet it's the future.

Cadman-LT
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Re: It's catchy
Cadman-LT   7/3/2012 2:19:52 PM
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SO if you want a marble replica, you would like it to look like marble? not be marble, just look like it right? I bet they could find a way to do that.

Cadman-LT
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Re: It's catchy
Cadman-LT   7/3/2012 2:14:51 PM
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So would you like for them to come up with a new material that you find suitable for replicas? is that the question? or can they or will they?...

Cadman-LT
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Re: It's catchy
Cadman-LT   7/3/2012 2:12:05 PM
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Well yes, it would be more expensive, but still cheaper. And couldn't they make them like any size they wanted? Yes. It all makes sense to me. 

 Are you asking how to print something out of something off...like wood or something? They will do wood, but it will be like particle board I bet. I guess you lost me on the materials.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: It's catchy
Ann R. Thryft   7/3/2012 12:37:22 PM
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Cadman-LT, I don't see why not, either. Except that's apparently a more expensive process. I didn't mind paying more for better quality statue and artifact reproductions, but apparently the museums and some of the third-party vendors decided to make them a lot cheaper with plastics. I don't know if the plastics they're now using for cheaper statues, etc. are made with 3D printing methods. In any case, the materials used with those machines must be designed for them. So that's why I'm wondering about how likely it is that new materials based on natural ones could be designed for 3D printing.

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