HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Engineering Materials
EV Race Car Uses Green Composites Under the Hood
5/15/2012

The Lola-Drayson B12/69EV prototype race car, which will compete in the all-electric FIA Formula E World Championship Series, uses recycled and plant-based composites in underhood components.   (Source: Lola Cars International Ltd.)
The Lola-Drayson B12/69EV prototype race car, which will compete in the all-electric FIA Formula E World Championship Series, uses recycled and plant-based composites in underhood components.
(Source: Lola Cars International Ltd.)

Return to Article

View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 4/4
Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Any possibility of commercial applicability?
Charles Murray   5/15/2012 7:38:28 PM
NO RATINGS
Nice story, Ann. Did they say which underhood components are being built from composites? In an earlier post, you mentioned that plastics are being used in some kind of EV battery partitions. Is this a trend we can expect to see going forward?

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Any possibility of commercial applicability?
Ann R. Thryft   5/15/2012 5:23:35 PM
NO RATINGS
In aerospace, the parallel is military aircraft developing technology that can then be used, eventually, by commercial aircraft. The poster child technology example here is carbon fiber composites.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Any possibility of commercial applicability?
Rob Spiegel   5/15/2012 4:36:27 PM
NO RATINGS
Good point on the bleeding-edge race cars, Ann. Chuck's recent Indy story -- and the comments that followed (http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=243839&itc=dn_analysis_element&) -- discussed how GM has used racing engines to help develop its production engines.

Jerry dycus
User Rank
Gold
Re: Any possibility of commercial applicability?
Jerry dycus   5/15/2012 3:34:40 PM
NO RATINGS
 

  Flax isn't like glass properties at all.  And I see little impact from fiberglass unless anyone has a sand shortage.  Considering the water, land, etc needed to grow flax and gathering, processing it is likely to be more than processing sand into FG.  Far less if one uses concentrated solar power.

If they wanted to get the best from flax it shouldn't have been woven.

The Epoxies I use are mostly made from fat and the cleaner is vinegar, water if not to far into curing.  I've used this combo for 40 yrs now not because it's green but because it's far less toxic to my fair skin.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Any possibility of commercial applicability?
Ann R. Thryft   5/15/2012 1:02:26 PM
NO RATINGS
naperlou is right: many leading-edge, and even bleeding-edge, technologies are used first in race cars before automakers decide to work with suppliers to adapt them to commercial applications. It's a free test-drive for the commercial automakers, as far as stress testing goes.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Any possibility of commercial applicability?
Ann R. Thryft   5/15/2012 12:59:42 PM
NO RATINGS
Beth, Much of what they do has commercial applicability: at some level, cars are cars. Major car makers have used engineering-grade plastics for under-hood applications, including bioplastics, although not recycled or bio-based composites. Tata Toyo, an Indian manufacturer of under-the-hood heat exchange parts, traded its specialty nylon materials] for DuPont's Zytel PLUS nylon for three hot-side and cold-side charge air coolers under the hood in the vehicle's engine compartment.
http://www2.dupont.com/Plastics/en_US/News_Events/article20120119.html
for use in four different vehicles, in passenger cars, utility vehicles, and light commercial vehicles, of an undisclosed major Indian automotive OEM. Zytel RS (renewably sourced) nylon has been chosen by Hutchinson SRL for diesel and biodiesel fuel lines.
http://www2.dupont.com/Plastics/en_US/News_Events/article20111018a.html
Other under-hood plastic parts include engine components. For example, Ford Motor Company reportedly uses high-temperature thermoplastics in its 3.5-liter V-6 EcoBoost engine for the F-150 truck, including key components like the cam cover, ducts, hoses and engine cover.
http://plasticsnews.com/headlines2.html?id=24273

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Any possibility of commercial applicability?
naperlou   5/15/2012 8:50:14 AM
NO RATINGS
Beth, the race car industry often leads the way in introducing new concepts to the driving public.  That's why many large manufacturers have their own race teams and often support independent race teams.  These guys can try things that are not used in production.  The stresses of the race circuit ensure that they are doing things that will work (or they will find out quickly what does not).  Lola has been around for a long time.  They build prototype cars and innovate constantly.  Some of the innovations in racing from safety equipment and designs to aerodynamics got their start in racing.  So, this is an interesting development with the novel composites they are using.  We might see something like it in our cars soon.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Any possibility of commercial applicability?
Beth Stackpole   5/15/2012 7:14:07 AM
NO RATINGS
It's amazing to me how much the race car industry pushes the envelope in terms of engineering technology, both green and otherwise. I know these are typically one-off or short production run implementations, but how much of what these guys do actually has commercial applicability?

<<  <  Page 4/4
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Engineering Materials
An MIT research team has invented what they see as a solution to the need for biodegradable 3D-printable materials made from something besides petroleum-based sources: a water-based robotic additive extrusion method that makes objects from biodegradable hydrogel composites.
Polish design firm NAS-DRA has proposed parasitic robotic drones that capture carbon dioxide from the air during the day and release it at night to plants growing on their wings.
Alcoa has unveiled a new manufacturing and materials technology for making aluminum sheet, aimed especially at automotive, industrial, and packaging applications. If all its claims are true, this is a major breakthrough, and may convince more automotive engineers to use aluminum.
NASA has just installed a giant robot to help in its research on composite aerospace materials, like those used for the Orion spacecraft. The agency wants to shave the time it takes to get composites through design, test, and manufacturing stages.
The European Space Agency (ESA) is working with architects Foster + Partners to test the possibility of using lunar regolith, or moon rocks, and 3D printing to make structures for use on the moon. A new video shows some cool animations of a hypothetical lunar mission that carries out this vision.
Design News Webinar Series
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service