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Engineering Materials

Nanodevices Self-Assemble Using DNA

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Rob Spiegel
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Targeted drugs
Rob Spiegel   8/1/2012 2:03:58 PM
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This is fascinating new technology, Ann. I would imagine one of the applications could be targeting chemotherapy to the cancer instead of having to broadcast it to healthy cells as well as cancerous cells.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Targeted drugs
Ann R. Thryft   8/2/2012 11:58:27 AM
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Isn't this amazing? Targeted drug delivery is definitely one of the possible apps the researchers have in mind, and if that could be done for chemotherapy it would make a lot of people healthier and happier.

williamlweaver
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Here Comes the SWARM
williamlweaver   8/1/2012 10:52:37 PM
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This is fantastic stuff, Ann. For those who wish to learn more about the application of this technology, you can read it here:
 
 
Just like Jurassic Park introduced the public to genomic technology, PREY explores the development of nanobots and genetic assembly. Let's hope that reality has a happier ending...
 
If you are interested, I wrote about this topic in April 2004. It looks like we are almost there.
 


Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Here Comes the SWARM
Ann R. Thryft   8/3/2012 12:37:25 PM
Thanks williamlweaver, glad you liked the article. Self-assembled devices is becoming quite an an active area of research. I have read Crichton's PREY: pretty scary stuff, in fact I found it his scariest so far because it's so believable, perhaps even inevitable. Thanks for the link to your swarms article--another area of research that's getting a lot of play, especially in robotics.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Here Comes the SWARM
Cabe Atwell   5/31/2014 12:26:40 AM
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Scientists are doing the same thing with MEMS-based devices, which self-assemble using an origami aspect of 'unfolding' themselves. 

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