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Engineering Materials

Self-Healing Plastic Changes Color When Damaged

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naperlou
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Plastics in need of healing?
naperlou   4/30/2012 11:07:17 AM
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Ann, this is interesting.  One thing I was thinking as I read this, though.  One of the attributes of plastics is their low cost.  One of the benefits of that is that you would replace the part rather than fix it.  Taking that into consideration, how does the cost of this type of plastic compare to conventional plastics?  I realize this is not in production yet.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Plastics in need of healing?
Ann R. Thryft   4/30/2012 1:01:38 PM
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Good question naperlou. You're right, this is not close to commercial development yet, so cost differentials are unknown. But since a self-healing plastic like this one--which unusually can self-heal multiple times--prolongs the life of the object many times, it means using less of it during that time. That cost amortization, as well as the benefits of not throwing away the object, implies that the COO to manufacturers would be lower than buying it once. I think the point here is that it's not aimed at high-volume, low-cost throwaway applications, but ones where continued use of a high-value product is important, such as military products or structural components.


Charles Murray
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Re: Plastics in need of healing?
Charles Murray   4/30/2012 5:25:27 PM
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Interesting story, Ann. I'm wondering if there are certain types of material damage that cannot be self-repaired. Your story mentions scratches. What about deformation caused by bending, particularly beyond the elastic limit of the material? If it could self-repair in those situations, it seems like it could be used in structural applications.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Plastics in need of healing?
Ann R. Thryft   5/1/2012 1:06:02 PM
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Chuck, the types of damage mentioned were all surface types, such as cuts, cracks and scratches. This is not aimed at repairing structural damage.

gsmith120
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Demo Self-Healing Plastic
gsmith120   4/30/2012 1:13:57 PM
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Very interesting article Ann.  It would have been nice if they had some kind of demo or video (in x speed) to show the self-healing process. 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Demo Self-Healing Plastic
Ann R. Thryft   4/30/2012 5:58:13 PM
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gsmith, I agree, a real-time color video would have been great. If we're lucky, they may put one up later.


NadineJ
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Smart Plastic
NadineJ   4/30/2012 1:33:24 PM
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Thanks for the great article.  naperlou makes a good point but I think the evolution of materials is moving away from convenience and towards true sustainability.  The throw away culture we created in the early 20th century can't continue.  Textiles made from pre and post consumer materials like milk fiber and wood bark were put on the shelf for the new thing--nylon.  Now, we're dusting off that old research.

This sounds good but impractical for now.  The cost and application make it very limited.  if something like this could exist in medical devices, I'd be very impressed.

Looking forard to hearing more about this in the future.

 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Smart Plastic
Ann R. Thryft   4/30/2012 6:05:31 PM
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Nadine, I think you're right about moving toward sustainability. But that's exactly what this could provide. Sustainable materials includes those made from greener materials (with lots of discussion about what that means), with greener processes (ditto), which can be recycled in various ways, and/or which can be used longer before being thrown away (or before being recycled). Sustainable materials can fulfill one or more of those 4 categories. This material can be classified in the last category.

We don't yet know how much more this plastic would cost, although it's being targeted at higher-priced apps, that's true. But after being developed for commercial production with those R&D dollars, it could then be extended and adapted to lower-cost apps, like medical. This is a common roadmap for new technologies.


NadineJ
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Re: Smart Plastic
NadineJ   4/30/2012 8:21:17 PM
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@Ann-I completely agree.  Cost is a major factor for mass market appeal.  But, if the cost is the same or just slightly higher, it can fit into the general trend towards sustainability.

The article says that the plastic has to be exposed to intense light to heal itself.  That's limiting for most medical implants but could be usuful in sports safety and performance enhancement equipment.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Smart Plastic
Ann R. Thryft   5/1/2012 1:12:39 PM
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Nadine, intense light is one possible exposure mechanism--the article also mentions changes in temperature or pH. I'm not sure why strong light would be a problem for an implant, since an implant is usually kept away from light. Can you tell us more about what you mean?


NadineJ
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Re: Smart Plastic
NadineJ   5/1/2012 2:01:32 PM
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Ann: I'm thinkiing specifically about joint replacement.  I had the honor to attend an orthopaedic surgeons conference a few months ago. The technology is very interesting and has been making slow advances, especially in hip replacements.  Even temperature and PH changes would be problematic for spine, knee and hip replacements.

But, it may cause less trauma than entirely replacing the unit.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Smart Plastic
Ann R. Thryft   5/1/2012 2:13:59 PM
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Nadine, thanks for the clarification. Since this material is aimed at self-repairing surface damage, I don't think it's designed for implants. But that's an interesting idea. There are many biocompatible plastics made for that application, and designing one of those to be self-healing would be a good PhD project.

Greg M. Jung
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Re: Smart Plastic
Greg M. Jung   4/30/2012 9:09:38 PM
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Ann, I liked your point about new medical applications for this technology.  Many medical plastic components are constantly exposed to harsh sterilization chemicals during regular cleaning and maintenance procedures.  If this self-healing process also works after a chemical exposure, it could be an interesting advancement for medical equipment designers.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Smart Plastic
Ann R. Thryft   5/2/2012 12:51:27 PM
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Thanks Greg, that's a really good example of the type of application this could serve.

Mydesign
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Re: Smart Plastic
Mydesign   5/1/2012 5:05:11 AM
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Ann, first of all plastic is not an environmental friendly material. So most of the countries are trying either to reduce or ban the use of plastics. In such a scenario, what's the relevance of these types of thermoplastics? Is it something in an environmental friendly way?

ChasChas
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Re: Smart Plastic
ChasChas   5/1/2012 10:03:07 AM
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I don't think this is just about plactic. This looks like a venture into "intelligent material" in general.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Smart Plastic
Ann R. Thryft   5/3/2012 12:59:52 PM
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ChasChas, thanks for that comment. I agree with you. I've reported on several other experimental materials that seem to be moving toward intelligence, some of them via nanotechnology, and many of them based on shifts in electrical charge.


Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Smart Plastic
Ann R. Thryft   5/1/2012 1:13:41 PM
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Mydesign, most countries are trying to find alternate feedstocks for plastics, like bioplastics, and/or design plastics that are compostable or recyclable, as I've written about here

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=239645

http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=239662

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=240409

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=241854

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=242634

Meanwhile, these new plastics are only a drop in the huge bucket of the amount of plastics we consume. So extending the life of non-recyclable, non-compostable plastics by reusing them helps keep them out of the landfill.


William K.
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Self-healing plastics
William K.   5/5/2012 9:52:53 PM
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It would be quite useful to know some of the more common materials propertiies of this self healing material, such as strength, stiffness, and temperature ratings, and that all important property, PRICE. My guess is that it would never be found in consumer goods evenif the cost were half that of styrene regrind. It appears that many consumer goods have avery intentional low quality level, so that they would be replaced every few months.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Self-healing plastics
Ann R. Thryft   5/7/2012 12:30:53 PM
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William, thanks for your comment. I agree with you about this not being likely for consumer-grade use. We addressed this issue earlier in the thread: since this is not close to commercial development yet, price and cost differentials are unknown. But self-healing plastics like this one--which unusually can self-heal multiple times--multiply the life of the object several times. Less plastic gets used during that time, so the COO to manufacturers would be lower than buying it once. It's not aimed at high-volume, low-cost throwaway applications, but ones where continued use of a high-value product is important, such as military or medical products.

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