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Engineering Materials
Video: 3D Printing With Moon Rocks
12/26/2012

Washington State University engineers have 3D-printed some simple-shaped objects using a simulant of lunar regolith, a mixture of loose dust, rock, and soil that covers solid bedrock. Shown here, Apollo 16 astronaut Charlie Duke drives a core sample tube into the lunar regolith.   (Source: NASA)
Washington State University engineers have 3D-printed some simple-shaped objects using a simulant of lunar regolith, a mixture of loose dust, rock, and soil that covers solid bedrock. Shown here, Apollo 16 astronaut Charlie Duke drives a core sample tube into the lunar regolith.
(Source: NASA)

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William K.
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3D printing with moon dust.
William K.   12/27/2012 10:24:08 AM
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Lunar Regolith sounds a lotlike moon dust, which should be available in adequate quantities on the moon, it seems. 

What are the mechanical properties of the parts fabricated thus far, and are they actually useable? I know that the first 3D printed parts were primarily useful for visualizing and not much else. But tha was in 1988.

Producing parts from the materials listed does not seem like they would be very tough, but rather very hard and quite brittle, unless some additional work was done on the mixture prior to laser sintering. I see a real challenge in providing a uniform particle size and uniform chemical composition.

Providing enough power to run the 3D printer is the other challenge that could be an obstacle to using the process onthe moon, although with an adequate solar array enough power should be available.

If more information is available a discussion of the properties of the material will be an interesting presentation indeed.

ChasChas
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Re: 3D printing with moon dust.
ChasChas   12/27/2012 11:21:45 AM
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I never realized how limited the material choices are on planets that never had life.

No wood. No oil. No coal. etc. all there is is minerals - and not even "live" soil that will grow something.

kf2qd
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Zero Gravity???
kf2qd   12/27/2012 12:29:42 PM
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Didn't know that printing on the Moon or Mars would require working in a "zero gravity" environment. Low gravity, as compared to earth maybe, but not zero gravity. If you are going to be making stuff to be used on the surface it would make no sense to transport it to space and then back to the surface as that would have a heavy cost in fuel that would be in short supply.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D printing with moon dust.
Ann R. Thryft   12/27/2012 1:52:15 PM
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William, both materials and processes are still in development, as we mentioned in the article. I think a bigger challenge than materials development will be the point you mention about power sources.

Greg M. Jung
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Re: 3D printing with moon dust.
Greg M. Jung   12/27/2012 10:59:16 PM
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Ann, did you get a sense of what types of components will have the first priority for fabrication on the moon?  I would imagine that the limited material available will also limit the variety of parts that can be fabricated.

JimG
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Re: 3D printing with moon dust.
JimG   12/28/2012 9:50:46 AM
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Greg,


If you mine the regolith on the moon's surface, there are actually quite a bit of materials that can be processed.  Different locations on the moon will result in different percentages in composition.  My employer, Teledyne Brown Engineering (TBE), has worked with Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on In Situ Fabrication and Repair (ISFR) where we looked at using lunar regolith as a feedstock for additive manufacturing as well as other complementary projects.  We specifically looked at the EBM process.  With the EBM using a vacuum in their build chamber, the lunar environment is an excellent one.  We have looked at mining oxygen from the lunar surface and using the waste products from this process (metal oxides), converting it to powder, and using it as the feedstock.  It is certainly possible.  There is titanium and other metals available on the moon.

We have looked at mining this material, as well as combining all metal "waste", and also looking at the lunar regolith.  We did this work 4-5 years ago using a couple different simulants.  We made some brick samples using lunar simulant along with a binder.  The funding stopped and we could not continue this work.  The funds were re-directed to more short-term work such as building a new rocket to replace the shuttle fleet!  Other areas of interest included non-destructive inspection of additive manufactured parts such as Microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive testing and evaluation methods.  We looked at post-processing these AM parts to arrive at acceptable tolerances.  We even looked at growing biological parts as well as producing electrical components such as PC Boards and discreet components.


I'm glad to see additional work being done in this area.  We spent 4-5 years working on everything from a lunar base to documenting possible existing parts on the ISS that could be replicated using additive manufacturing in space.  NASA is very interested in looking at in situ manufacturing and this work will help make it happen.  We worked with the Contour Crafter in building habitats and building launch/landing sites.


This was some really fun work.  Hopefully, we can get the project going again and help make some significant progress!

 

Greg, to answer your other question concerning what components will be fabricated first, you have to decide what spares make sense to bring with you.  In some cases, the upmass makes sense to bring the spares.  I think the first things to fabrciate may be simple tools or unique tools made for specific applications.  Additionally, the exercise equipment is always in need of repair on the ISS so I could see some repair parts for the crew health equipment.

Jim

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D printing with moon dust.
Ann R. Thryft   12/28/2012 12:22:48 PM
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Greg, most of what I've read mentions simple tools and replacement parts would be the prime candidates. But then there's also the idea of making structures, like Contour Crafting has proposed http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=250614 JimG, thanks for weighing in with your direct experience. I think this is a very promising and exciting area to be working in.

Scott Orlosky
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Re: 3D printing with moon dust.
Scott Orlosky   12/30/2012 11:54:04 PM
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Jim, thanks for your insider information on the subject.  Here's hoping we have a good reason to go back to the moon to take advantage of this and other developments.

jmiller
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Re: 3D printing with moon dust.
jmiller   12/31/2012 11:30:38 AM
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I have to agree. I never thought of all of the things you would have to do without while being up there.  It's not like you can just go down the street and pick up a screw at the local hardware store.

jmiller
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Re: 3D printing with moon dust.
jmiller   12/31/2012 11:32:02 AM
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Great article.  This is just down right pretty cool when you think about it.  I really enjoy reading articles like this.

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