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Engineering Materials
Slideshow: Next-Gen Wave Glider Robot Propelled by Solar
5/7/2013

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Liquid Robotics' new Wave Glider robot, the SV3 (right, in red) is bigger than its predecessor, SV2 (left, in yellow), shown during sea trials in Hawaii. The SV3 uses stored solar energy for part of its propulsion system, combined with the Wave Glider's unique, wave-powered energy harvesting system.   (Source: Liquid Robotics)
Liquid Robotics' new Wave Glider robot, the SV3 (right, in red) is bigger than its predecessor, SV2 (left, in yellow), shown during sea trials in Hawaii. The SV3 uses stored solar energy for part of its propulsion system, combined with the Wave Glider's unique, wave-powered energy harvesting system.
(Source: Liquid Robotics)

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Rob Spiegel
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Impressive tech combo
Rob Spiegel   5/7/2013 8:44:54 AM
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Ann, this is a remarkable integration of a number of technologies -- solar, battery, energy storage, conversion of ocean movement. If you gather a number of technologies together no sngle technology has to be perfect. This is a good example.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Impressive tech combo
Elizabeth M   5/7/2013 9:12:44 AM
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It's nice to see the evolution of this useful and innovative robot as it uses alternative energy sources, Ann. I wrote about this technology awhile back and thought it always had a solar component, though? Is this just an extension of that? Or was I misled or mistaken?

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Impressive tech combo
Ann R. Thryft   5/7/2013 1:00:10 PM
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Elizabeth, the Wave Glider you and I have both written about before did have solar, but it was not used for propulsion--instead, it powered the instruments in the payload, as the article states, and as is still the case. Now, some of that solar energy is also stored and used for propulsion.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Impressive tech combo
Ann R. Thryft   5/7/2013 1:02:10 PM
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Rob, thanks for that observation--I agree about the integration of technologies. That, plus using solar for propulsion, is why I wanted to share this with our readers. It's also why the robot won the Edison Award even before this latest innovation.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Impressive tech combo
Rob Spiegel   5/7/2013 5:10:34 PM
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I would imagine the integration of emerging technology will become more common. There are so many new sustainable technologies that are getting proved, it's only natural that end products will begin to show up with a convergence of new technologies.

Debera Harward
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Re: Impressive tech combo
Debera Harward   5/7/2013 5:39:10 PM
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Ahan Ann , Thats really very great uptill now i have only heard about unmanned ground vehicle but this is the very first time i came to know about unmanned marine vehicle with soo many add on features included into it. These sort of marine robots are really very usefull as they help us to gather all the marine information in any type of climate cost effectively . With these sort of unmanned marine vehicles we can keep ourselves aware from earth quakes, tsunamis, and ocean storms etc without engaging any human life in it .

Charles Murray
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Re: Impressive tech combo
Charles Murray   5/7/2013 8:56:26 PM
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Agreed, Rob. The interesting twist here is that the two sources -- solar and waves -- would seem to be complementary. Typically, the sea is at it's calmest under a clear sky and the waves are highest under overcast skies. If that's the case, one source provides power while the other is idle.  

AnandY
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Re: Impressive tech combo
AnandY   5/8/2013 2:09:20 AM
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Unmanned marine vehicles can also be used to perform naval missions without endangering humans in hazardous areas. They can be used for patrolling of the coasts.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Impressive tech combo
Elizabeth M   5/8/2013 7:49:38 AM
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Ah, OK, Ann, now I get it. Very cool how they have extended the use of solar. I think these are some of the most innovative robots with some of the greatest potential for use.

PaPaMuski
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Re: Impressive tech combo
PaPaMuski   5/8/2013 8:30:25 AM
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I am curious about how wave motion is converted into a propulsion force

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