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Engineering Materials
Slideshow: 3D Printing Will Go to Mars
9/13/2012

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NASA-funded research by University of Southern California professors Behrokh Khoshnevis, Madhu Thangavelu, Neil Leach, and Anders Carlson is exploring how structures on the moon can made using the Contour Crafting robot. Under NASA's Innovative Advanced Concepts program, the researchers aim to develop methods for creating infrastructure, such as roads and landing pads, to support human settlement on the moon. The technology can create structures in situ from local materials, which is especially important for long-term, continuously expanding operations on the moon. For example, the team is exploring a nozzle system that heats lunar soil into a cement-like paste. In this visualization by Behnaz Farahi and Connor Wingfield, a lander descends on a pad fabricated by the Contour Crafting robot. (Source: University of Southern California/Contour Crafting)
NASA-funded research by University of Southern California professors Behrokh Khoshnevis, Madhu Thangavelu, Neil Leach, and Anders Carlson is exploring how structures on the moon can made using the Contour Crafting robot. Under NASA's Innovative Advanced Concepts program, the researchers aim to develop methods for creating infrastructure, such as roads and landing pads, to support human settlement on the moon. The technology can create structures in situ from local materials, which is especially important for long-term, continuously expanding operations on the moon. For example, the team is exploring a nozzle system that heats lunar soil into a cement-like paste. In this visualization by Behnaz Farahi and Connor Wingfield, a lander descends on a pad fabricated by the Contour Crafting robot.
(Source: University of Southern California/Contour Crafting)

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NadineJ
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Re: Fascinating
NadineJ   9/14/2012 1:11:25 AM
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The Contour Crafting does look very cool. Is there any video from Made in Space. It would be great to see their anti-gravity tests.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Concerns about extreme Cold
Ann R. Thryft   9/14/2012 12:34:30 PM
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Jim, thanks for that experimental info. I've read elsewhere that one big inhibitor to date for using AM techniques in aerospace is the lack of resistance of the materials to temperature extremes, especially high temps. OTOH, high-end AM materials are not just for making prototypes anymore--they're increasingly used for low-end aerospace production components, as we've covered here http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=236261 But since Stratasys' FDM is being used on test parts for Mars rovers, NASA must believe it's possible to overcome those limitations. Also, other materials have worked successfully on non-interior aircraft parts, usually processed with various forms of SLS.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D printing has come a long way
Ann R. Thryft   9/14/2012 12:35:00 PM
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Chuck, I agree. I consider my discovery of the Contour Crafting website a highlight of my AM reporting so far this year.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Fascinating
Ann R. Thryft   9/14/2012 12:36:14 PM
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Nadine, I haven 't seen a MIS video. Let us know if you find one.

78RPM
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Re: Fascinating
78RPM   9/14/2012 1:32:53 PM
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Yes, Ann, manufacturing buildings fascinated me too. Why should it take a family 30 years to pay for a house? 3D AM from local materials might be the answer to prosperity for the whole world.

Beth Stackpole
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Re: Fascinating
Beth Stackpole   9/14/2012 1:44:26 PM
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The idea of being able to 3D print whole buildings is definitely something that could have huge impact on housing the developing world or even providing respite after disasters like the Japanese earthquake and tsunami and the earthquake in Haiti. I would think it's a fast, reasonably inexpensive way to get shelter up and usable quickly. I hope that this actually can become a reality because the possibilities are pretty unbelievable.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Fascinating
Ann R. Thryft   9/14/2012 2:45:21 PM
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78RPM, I'm with you on that. In the ancient days, we built our own houses with the help of the local community using local materials, and it sure didn't take 30 years.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Fascinating
Ann R. Thryft   9/14/2012 2:49:07 PM
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Beth, the Mars project--even if only built on the ground during testing--should give some good data for the intended use of the technology, which the website states is emergency and low-cost shelters and/or permanent housing, ads well as commercial buildings. It will be interesting to see the results.

NadineJ
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Re: Fascinating
NadineJ   9/16/2012 10:45:09 AM
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@Ann-If I can carve out the time to do research on this, I'll post anything I find.

William K.
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3D printing: a replicator, perhaps?
William K.   9/16/2012 3:02:21 PM
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Shades of Star Trek and the ever present replicators, that usually produced food ready to eat. I do have some concerns about where the feed material, with it's fairly demanding characteristics, comes from. Of course, native soil on the moon and on Mars may have properties that make it suitable for the process, but they might not.  And draqgging along the raw materials will be as heavy as bringing finished parts. MY other concern is about where the energy to fuse the powder into objects will come from. Deveoping enough heat to fuse materials does take a fair amount of heat.and that power needs to come from some place. So the additive manufacturing machine in space has some real challenges ahead for it. On earth, of course, the situation is totally different, except the question of where the materials come from is still to be answered. Possibly some version that uses course feedstock will be invented.

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