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Engineering Materials

Metals Still Rule in Lightweighting

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Legacy materials fight back
Ann R. Thryft   6/7/2012 12:57:30 PM
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Actually, fabrication difficulty is mentioned several times in the article, both directly and indirectly, as moldability, disruptive technology vs non-disruptive technology, as "3D components involve a more complicated, expensive molding technology" and "CFRPs are not only more expensive, but using them is also a step change difference, which is much greater than transitioning from using one metal to another metal." Regarding recyclability, it's interesting to note that Boeing has invested in composite recycling: http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=235280

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Legacy materials fight back
Rob Spiegel   6/7/2012 2:17:15 PM
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You're right about the end of life of steel and aluminum. Steel's big argument in the face of new materials is the ease of recycling.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Legacy materials fight back
Ann R. Thryft   6/8/2012 2:12:45 PM
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Rob, I agree about the recycling difference. Recycling composites is not an easy thing to do, and will not be a simple solution.

sjmonte@4kenrich.com
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Iron
Re: How Strong?
sjmonte@4kenrich.com   6/8/2012 9:03:29 PM
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Ann:  We have exhibited in the past few months at the following conferences and trade shows: ACMA 2012; SAMPE 2012; American Coatings Show 2012; ACS Rubber Division Energy Rubber Group Winter Conference; SPI NPE 2012; and SPE International Polyolefins 2012. So, it's just not fiberglass reinforced polyester.  I am talking about all manner of inorganic and organic reinforcements used in thermosets and thermoplastics  We manufacture since 1973 organometallic coupling agents based on titanium, zirconim, and aluminum chemistry - rather than silane chemistry.  I have 29-U.S. Patents and 1 pending on their composition of matter and their application, and 375-ACS CAS abstracted works on the subject of the interface and their application in polymer compositions. 

A class of neoalkoxy and coordinate titanates and zirconates can coordinate couple to any surface via its protons ever present on the inorganic/organic reinforcement - from carbon and aramid fiber to CaCO3 to PTFE - thus forming an impervious 1.5-nanometer chemical bridge between say the carbon fiber and epoxy.  The fiber does not have to be pretreated, but can be coupled in-situ becase water of condensation is not needed as with silanes, which react with surface hydroxyls to form a silanol oligomer, which in turn condenses with the surface hydroxyl group to condense 3-moles of water, which must be removed.

The titanate or zirconate uses the resin phase to bring it to the interface and deposit 1.5-nanometer atomic monolayers thus bonding the resin to the reinforcement surface that subsequently resists aged deterioration under high pressure, high temperature, and severe environmental conditions such as 240-hr. water boil in 10% salt water.  This mechanism works on all manner of carbonaceous substrates: carbon fiber; carbon black; carbon nano tubes; graphene; etc.

For example, carbon fiber reinforced methyl nadic anhydride cured epoxy composites produced by General Dynamics without zirconate will have a long-fiber tensile strength of 62 Joules, which will deteriorate to 21 Joules 240-hr. water boil in 10% salt water, while 4-parts per thousand of a zirconate [Ken-React(r) NZ(r) 97] added to the epoxy will yield 119 Joules Tensile initial and 113 Joules when similarly water boiled aged.

Sal Monte

http://www.4kenrich.com/Pagesetter/viewpub/tid/1/pid/1

 

Dave Palmer
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Platinum
Re: How Strong?
Dave Palmer   6/11/2012 12:57:32 PM
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@sjmonte: A joule is a unit of energy, not tensile strength.  Tensile strengths are customarily given in units of pascals; one joule per cubic meter is equal to one pascal.  However, since one pascal is very small, it's common to use the megapascal, i.e. million pascals, as the base unit.

Could you please give us the tensile strength in either megapascals or pounds per square inch?

In any case, the strength increases you report (more than 2x dry and more than 5x wet) are very impressive.  If you have been producing these coupling agents since the 1970s, why haven't they been more widely adopted? I'd expect the composites industry to be extremely enthusiastic about something like this.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Legacy materials fight back
Rob Spiegel   6/18/2012 3:22:39 PM
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The steel industry is trying to make the most of the difficulties in recycling composites. They keep saying, "Hey, you have to look at the green value from cradle to grave."

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