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China Teams With Boeing to Increase Aircraft Production

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TJ McDermott
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Re: A little leery
TJ McDermott   4/3/2012 9:52:26 AM
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The keys were already given away.  Substantial portions of the 787 wing are made in Japan and Korea.

wheely
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Boeing in China?
wheely   4/3/2012 11:36:28 AM
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 Come on Boeing, didn't you learn anything from the outsourcing during 787 production. Every product I've seen or heard of being sent to Mexico or China is inferior.

 WOW, looks like Boeing needs new management again.

sensor pro
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Gold
Re: A little leery
sensor pro   4/3/2012 2:00:10 PM
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This is unreal. why to go to China and give out our secrets, while we have millions of unemployed ready to work. This is a win-win. Stay here and use our people and keep technology local.

What are they thinking !!!

Dave Palmer
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Platinum
Re: A little leery
Dave Palmer   4/3/2012 3:08:59 PM
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The world doesn't revolve around the United States.  China is a huge and growing market, and aerospace companies would be foolish to ignore it.  There is also a tremendous amount of talent in Chinese universities and research institutions, not to mention money for research.  Boeing and Bombardier are engaging in these partnerships because they clearly think it is in their commercial interest to do so.

A lot of people seem to be saying that the Chinese only know how to copy, not how to innovate; that the quality of Chinese products is always inferior; that the Chinese are avaricious and can't be trusted, etc.

Besides being completely unfair generalizations, these are also the same things which people in Britain and Germany said about the U.S. in the 1800s.

Research into how to make commercial aircraft more fuel efficient, develop improved lightweight aluminum alloys, etc. is a good thing, no matter what country it takes place in.

sensor pro
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Re: A little leery
sensor pro   4/3/2012 3:20:20 PM
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In my opinion your statement is very purist. It is nice and dandy to have partners in other parts of the world, however do not forget who these partners are. Not all are our friends in heart. With all the problems of Chinese stealing secrets from numerous coutries, serious drive to increase and make stronger their military, air force and navy, does california really need to buy steel from them. Can't we find scientists in US to work on lighter and more durable Aluminum. Don't we have refinaries that can produce it?!

We need to stop looking for fast savings by moving abroad, and should start supporting our own industries.Not always the basic commercial interest should take over the decision process.

I do feel that we are loosing our knowhow and industrial power to other countries, and it is not smart.

 

 

Dave Palmer
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Re: A little leery
Dave Palmer   4/3/2012 4:58:37 PM
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@sensorpro: Aluminum is being produced in the U.S., and scientists in the U.S. are working on developing lighter and stronger aluminum alloys.  In fact, Chinese scientists in the U.S. are working on developing lighter and stronger aluminum alloys.  Particularly when it comes to research, I don't think innovation in one country is an impediment to innovation in another country.  It's not a zero-sum game.

sensor pro
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Re: A little leery
sensor pro   4/3/2012 7:55:54 PM
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My point had nothing to do with who works on Aluminum or anything else for that affect. We are too open with out technology. What I'm saying is that our govenment created over 15% unemployment, basically crippled NASA, has engineers working in landscaping, while California purchases Billions of steel from China. Parts of planes are made in China and Korea. Eight or six solar power companies are chapter 11 due to missmanagement, fraud and due to unreasonably low panel prices from China.

And now we are "happy" that 787 will be partially made or developed in China.

Did I miss anything?!

 

Take that money and hire our guys and develop it inhouse. Am I wrong ?

 

 

Dave Palmer
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Platinum
Re: A little leery
Dave Palmer   4/3/2012 8:48:12 PM
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@sensorpro: The article doesn't say that the 787 will be partially made or developed in China.  The article mentions that one of the areas of collaboration is lightweight alloys, and the 787 is given as an example of a Boeing aircraft where lightweight alloys are used.

By all means, let's have more R&D in the U.S.  But that doesn't mean that companies shouldn't do R&D in China also.  It's entirely possible that some of the technologies developed at the Boeing-COMAC center may eventually create jobs in the U.S.  

sensor pro
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Re: A little leery
sensor pro   4/3/2012 9:59:34 PM
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I really hope so. Due to my previous experience with "global cooperation" I lost confidence in these projects. I found that some countries have a trust issue, and China is one of them.

Lets hope for the best. We can agree on that.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: A little leery
Ann R. Thryft   4/4/2012 9:44:36 AM
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Well said, tekochip. I would add, not only does the US have a strong presence in aerospace and commercial aircraft in particular, but those are also well-paying jobs.

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