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Engineering Materials

Composite Plane Repair Aided by Coating

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Alexander Wolfe
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Re: Onboard Coatings
Alexander Wolfe   1/26/2012 6:10:25 PM
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Thanks for the info, Ann. So that means that the ability to utilize this detection technique will be proprietary, but I guess it also indicates that the state of the technology is at the point where other composite makers should be able to do this too, at least eventually. (That's unless there's only a very narrow class of coatings which are amenable to the detection process, and they're patented or trade secret.) Anyway, I guess the upshot is that this is not going to be anywhere near as industry-widee as I assume. At the same time, it opens up the idea that, with technology advancing, maybe the FAA can move towards some specificity in its composites directives.

Charles Murray
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Re: A no-brainer?
Charles Murray   1/26/2012 9:59:43 PM
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True, Dave. Like many great ideas, it seems obvious after the fact.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Onboard Coatings
Ann R. Thryft   1/27/2012 11:34:31 AM
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TJ, that's funny, using whiteout to detect cracks and delams. I bet it worked great. But I doubt if that would work on CFR composites or even glass-reinforced composites. Damage on these, especially CFR, is invisible to the naked eye and techniques for detecting it different from those used for detecting same in traditional materials. You are right, I carefully did not reveal the wavelength since I honored the company's request in order to get this much published.

You say damage-detecting coatings have been around for awhile, but not using non-visible wavelengths. Do you mean that damage-detecting coatings *for these composites* have been around for awhile? Please inform us if you know!


Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Onboard Coatings
Ann R. Thryft   1/27/2012 11:35:24 AM
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Alex, thanks for thinking industry-wide again. I agree, the technology is certainly in the early stages and it makes me wonder how many other coatings manufacturers or composite airstructure makers are conducting similar research under the radar, possibly even in partnership with each other. It might make more sense from an industry standpoint to develop and commercialize something that can be applied by all airstructure manufacturers and regulated by the FAA. But that also assumes that it can be applied in an aftermarket scenario and still work properly. I get the impression that GKN's coating needs to be "baked" in, either literally or figuratively, in order to do its job. But that could also be because they are not a coatings manufacturer.


Charles Murray
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Re: Onboard Coatings
Charles Murray   1/27/2012 5:51:34 PM
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Ann, do we know much about today's composite crack investigation techniques? Is this better or just faster and easier?

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Onboard Coatings
Ann R. Thryft   1/30/2012 11:54:12 AM
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Chuck, someone knows a lot about the subject, and I wish I did. I've already spent quite a lot of time surfing and snooping around on the Web, but it's quite difficult to find out anything aside from what's in that GAO report, and Boeing is less than forthcoming. I assume this is for security and/or market competition reasons. I'm checking the MRO schools' websites for course descriptions, e.g., but not much luck so far. The thing to remember, in general, is that repair techniques have existed as long as composites in aircraft have existed, but for some time it was all military. Then they entered the commercial aircraft sector, but not, I repeat not, in primary structures. Their use in primary structures has changed everything.


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