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Engineering Materials

NASA 3D Prints Rocket Engine Parts

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Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Steps to the future
Ann R. Thryft   11/27/2012 12:37:32 PM
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Jack, as mentioned below, these are very different app and technology areas. Here's a manufacturing publication article (plus comments) about industrial AM increasing the use of metals and how different these uses, and technology, are from the maker movement level of machines and materials:
http://www.manufacturing-executive.com/thread/2532
And here's a DN article about industrial 3D printing with non-plastic materials:
http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=252293
There are others listed at the bottom of this current article.

Jack Rupert, PE
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Platinum
Re: Steps to the future
Jack Rupert, PE   11/26/2012 4:42:14 PM
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I had not heard that the 3D printing capabilities had evolved beyond the prototype plastic materials.  This seems to be a big step forward.  Any news on multi-material printing yet?

G W Brewer
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Iron
Great News!
G W Brewer   11/26/2012 4:29:02 PM
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This is such excellent news!

We have been looking high an low for a way to on-board manufacture parts for the Dilithium platform orientation modules. Also, those pesky anitmatter nozzle modulators.

ChasChas
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Platinum
New process - Old design
ChasChas   11/26/2012 1:10:46 PM
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The picture looks like welded tubular design - why?

Why use a new process on an old design?

Upgrade the design to fit the process.

mrdon
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Platinum
Re: Innovative
mrdon   11/26/2012 12:21:29 PM
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Greg, I agree. Using 3D printers to make rocket components is quite intriguing. I know the testing of these components are probably more stringent than with conventional manufactured parts. I know the Maker community would love to have access to one of these machines in their Makerspace!

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Interesting new process
Ann R. Thryft   11/26/2012 11:53:43 AM
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Lou, thanks for weighing in on this one: I was curious to see what you'd say. Cabe, the stuff you've seen is probably on the consumer and prototype level 3D materials and processes, which mostly use metal, not plastic. Both materials and processes are, of course, quite different for industrial and aerospace uses, and for high-end automotive. I've heard of several stories like yours of unacceptable parts coming from vendors in the non-industrial network. It's important to know where the wall is between the two app areas.



William K.
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Platinum
NASA prints rocket engine parts
William K.   11/26/2012 10:16:54 AM
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Having NASA involved will probably speed the maturing of the 3-D printing process, since they always demand the very most reliable parts, and usually there is much less urgency about reducing costs. That is a vital difference between the space program and much of the junk produced for the "consumer" market, which has the primary target of minimum production cost. When lowest price is the prime directive and sole target, quality and reliability usually suffer. So the NASA use of 3-D printing will help gain understanding of how to produce better quality.

I am impressed with the fact that some of the process is good enough to put it inconsideration. Of course the space program is a very logical area, since the production quantities are fairly small, which makes the creation of tooling for each part much less economical.

It will be interesting to see what benefits are delivered by the NASA involvement now.

Stephen
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Gold
Re: Interesting new process
Stephen   11/26/2012 10:09:36 AM
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The J-2X engines for upper stages are a revision of the 1960's vintage J-2 upper stage Saturn 1B/Saturn 5 engines.

TOP
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Gold
Re: Interesting new process
TOP   11/26/2012 9:48:14 AM
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Cabe,


I think you are bringing up a non-issue. The whole point of the article was that NASA was evaluating the process. Having worked this industry I can assure you that the custom built machine, not the ones you may have used, will be thoroughly tested as will the process. If it can't be made to work it will be dropped. But given the payback if it can be made to work it will probably be pursued.


I have printed structural plastic parts that are still around today. Like any process for producing parts the engineer has to work with the process and not expect it to perform/behave like some other process.

Scott Orlosky
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Platinum
Re: Interesting new process
Scott Orlosky   11/24/2012 11:32:57 AM
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I feel confident that this additive manufacturing process will evolve further just as it has over the last several years.  Who knows what process development will be incorporated into parts like these to make them a viable alternative in the harsh environments of rocket propulsion systems.  Nice to see the innovation that this technology is fostering.

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