HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
REGISTER   |   LOGIN   |   HELP
Blogs
Engineering Materials
NASA Builds 3D Printer for Space
7/3/2013

Image 1 of 4      Next >

After nearly two years of R&D, and testing several different commercial 3D printers in zero gravity, NASA has partnered with Made in Space to develop a 3D printer for use on the Moon, Mars, and elsewhere in the solar system. It will be certified and launched next year for initial deployment on the International Space Station.   (Source: Made in Space)
After nearly two years of R&D, and testing several different commercial 3D printers in zero gravity, NASA has partnered with Made in Space to develop a 3D printer for use on the Moon, Mars, and elsewhere in the solar system. It will be certified and launched next year for initial deployment on the International Space Station.
(Source: Made in Space)

Image 1 of 4      Next >

Return to Article

View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/3  >  >>
Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Interesting R&D
Rob Spiegel   8/2/2013 7:38:34 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, it's very interesting. I like the idea that we're etting to the point w here we could build roads and structures on the moon using moondust.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Interesting R&D
Cabe Atwell   7/31/2013 7:08:26 PM
NO RATINGS
According to the Made in Space press release, they tested various 3D printers back in 2011. Perhaps they were done on the ISS or maybe even on NASA's 'Vomit Comet' plane. Still it's interesting to see where this will lead!

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Interesting R&D
Rob Spiegel   7/25/2013 8:24:16 PM
NO RATINGS
Good point, elizabeth. But it think it depends on what branch of government. If building on the moon was a matter of national security, there would be a budget for it. The original space program was an elaborate national security effort to keep up with and eventually surpass, the Soviet Union. That's why it was well funded. When the space program was no longer viewed as a national security efflort, the funding dried up.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Interesting R&D
Elizabeth M   7/24/2013 9:04:08 AM
NO RATINGS
You're right, Rob, the technology is there...I just don't think the budget is! I used to write about the government space and to my recollection, they had a lot of budget cuts and financial worries there. So perhaps that's why this is all stalled even though the technology is there. With 3D printing and other technologies making things easier and cheaper, perhaps it will get a kick start.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Interesting R&D
Rob Spiegel   7/23/2013 8:29:25 AM
NO RATINGS
The amazing thing, Elizabeth, is that it is no longer futuristic. The technology is ready now. Maybe moves like this could help break the stalled human-based space program.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Interesting R&D
Elizabeth M   7/23/2013 5:17:32 AM
NO RATINGS
Exactly, Rob, so by the time legislation catches up, the technology will be ready for this type of futuristic project to happen. I hope it's in my lifetime! Would love to see that...or even go there.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Interesting R&D
Rob Spiegel   7/22/2013 4:24:40 PM
NO RATINGS
Like you, Elizabeth, I don't have high hopes for the bill, but I like it that the idea is getting discussed. I also like the idea that the tools for creating a habitat on the moon are getting developed.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Interesting R&D
Elizabeth M   7/22/2013 3:31:02 AM
NO RATINGS
A national park on the moon? Wow! Although given the pace of bills sometimes, it may take awhile for that to happen. But still, the possibility is incredible.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Interesting R&D
Rob Spiegel   7/19/2013 5:46:39 PM
NO RATINGS
It's starting to happen, Elizabeth. A couple of representatives have introduced a House bill to create a national park on the moon: H.R. 2617.

 

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: 3D printing at space station
Mydesign   7/19/2013 3:12:55 AM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
"thanks for the clarification. The whole point of 3D printers in space is to provide tools, replacement parts, etc. onsite."

Ann, replace parts- you mean that printing the exact parts in 3 dimensions and replacing it as component at space station. Amazing, plan to buy one for my office (grin)

Page 1/3  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Engineering Materials
3D printing has met up with drones in a 3D-printed UAV. University of Sheffield engineers printed the prototype drone in 24 hours from ABS plastic using Fused Deposition Modeling.
Some of the biggest self-assembled building blocks and structures made from engineered DNA have been developed by researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute. The largest, a hexagonal prism, is one-tenth the size of an average bacterium.
Arevo Labs' end-production 3D printing technology for carbon composites includes a high-temperature, filament fusion printer head design and firmware for use with the company's new carbon fiber and nanotube reinforced high-temperature matrix polymers like PEEK.
Stratasys will buy Solid Concepts and Harvest Technologies and combine them with its RedEye service business. The plan takes aim at end-production manufacturing and will create one of the biggest commercial 3D printing and AM service bureaus.
The International Federation of Robotics reports that global sales of industrial robots decreased by 4% in 2012 over 2011. The biggest hit was electrical/electronics manufacturing, down by 13%; but by region, the Amerficas did well.
Design News Webinar Series
3/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
2/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
12/18/2013 Available On Demand
11/20/2013 Available On Demand
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 21 - 25, Creating & Testing Your First RTOS Application Using MQX
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: April 29 - Day 1
Sponsored by maxon precision motors
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service