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Engineering Materials

US Navy Resin Will Make Composites Stronger, Flame-Resistant & Cheaper to Process

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Cabe Atwell
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Re: Contact Info for Navy Resin
Cabe Atwell   5/28/2014 2:35:26 AM
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The Navy's new powerful LaWS laser weapon is great at taking out composite targets over a mile away. How much time before other countries like China and Russia design their own and burn through our composites? 

GopherT
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Re: Contact Info for Navy Resin
GopherT   8/22/2013 4:13:56 PM
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Hey Crash55,

 

Try contacting Mr Keller at

teddy.keller at nrl.navy.mil>

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Contact Info for Navy Resin
Ann R. Thryft   8/20/2013 11:35:59 AM
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You're welcome, Crash55, and good luck.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Impressive details on an advanced subject matter
William K.   8/19/2013 6:45:10 PM
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OK, we will find out the rest of the details when and if it becomes commercially available. And probably my applications would be commercial.

Crash55
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Iron
Re: Contact Info for Navy Resin
Crash55   8/19/2013 1:33:06 PM
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Thanks. I missed the name the first time I read through it. I should be able to find him in one of the DoD directories.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Contact Info for Navy Resin
Ann R. Thryft   8/19/2013 1:02:43 PM
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Crash55, the contact is the person interviewed in the article. I reached him through the PR contact on the USNRL press release.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Impressive details on an advanced subject matter
Ann R. Thryft   8/19/2013 1:01:17 PM
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William, you're welcome. What you see here is what we were allowed to know. I understand from the source that NASA is very interested in this material, but I wasn't allowed to find out for what.

Crash55
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Iron
Contact Info for Navy Resin
Crash55   8/19/2013 9:08:57 AM
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Can you share the contact at NRL for this?  I work for the Army and we have some possible applications.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Impressive details on an advanced subject matter
William K.   8/18/2013 8:02:42 PM
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Ann, while I don't have a use for this information today, it is certainly handy to have. This source of knowledge is a resource, and like most resources becomes reallyn valuable wnen you need it, and only "interesting" the rest of the time. I can see an immediate application of this material in high frequency hiher power RF electrical applications. 

What was not mentioned about the new material was outgassing, which affects the usefulness of a material for satellite and space applications, and also for semiconductor fabrication applications. 

So thatks for the educational article.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: Impressive details on an advanced subject matter
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   8/15/2013 6:19:31 PM
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ON the issue of technical writing, DN has consistently evidenced that the deeper a technical issue is, the lesser the comments.  (Case in point; this article).  But I think that should be expected; -- for example, there have been several other deep articles from Guest Bloggers that I couldn't begin to comment on. The interested field of commenters just naturally narrows.

ON the subject of RIM, I was [minimally] familiar with another industrial process – Reaction Injection Molding (a different RIM) which is [loosely translated as] an injection of a 2-part epoxy.  A very slow processing time because 'cure' is required.  Checking my old faithful resource, Wikipedia doesn't have a page for your definition of RIM but does link it to your other suggested process, Resin Transfer (RTM). 

Always interesting to learn about new things – Thanks!

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