HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Engineering Materials
US Navy Resin Will Make Composites Stronger, Flame-Resistant & Cheaper to Process
8/14/2013

A new high-performance, PEEK-like phthalonitrile resin developed by the US Naval Research Laboratory is resistant to high temperatures, flammability, and impacts, and can be processed using standard methods like resin infusion molding and resin transfer molding. Loss tangent characteristics and excellent dielectric permittivity make it especially useful in applications where RF transparency is required, such as high-temperature radomes that shield radar antennae like the one on the top of this E-2C Hawkeye aircraft.  (Source: US Navy)
A new high-performance, PEEK-like phthalonitrile resin developed by the US Naval Research Laboratory is resistant to high temperatures, flammability, and impacts, and can be processed using standard methods like resin infusion molding and resin transfer molding. Loss tangent characteristics and excellent dielectric permittivity make it especially useful in applications where RF transparency is required, such as high-temperature radomes that shield radar antennae like the one on the top of this E-2C Hawkeye aircraft.
(Source: US Navy)

Return to Article

View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Contact Info for Navy Resin
Cabe Atwell   5/28/2014 2:35:26 AM
NO RATINGS
The Navy's new powerful LaWS laser weapon is great at taking out composite targets over a mile away. How much time before other countries like China and Russia design their own and burn through our composites? 

GopherT
User Rank
Silver
Re: Contact Info for Navy Resin
GopherT   8/22/2013 4:13:56 PM
NO RATINGS
Hey Crash55,

 

Try contacting Mr Keller at

teddy.keller at nrl.navy.mil>

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Contact Info for Navy Resin
Ann R. Thryft   8/20/2013 11:35:59 AM
NO RATINGS
You're welcome, Crash55, and good luck.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Impressive details on an advanced subject matter
William K.   8/19/2013 6:45:10 PM
NO RATINGS
OK, we will find out the rest of the details when and if it becomes commercially available. And probably my applications would be commercial.

Crash55
User Rank
Iron
Re: Contact Info for Navy Resin
Crash55   8/19/2013 1:33:06 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks. I missed the name the first time I read through it. I should be able to find him in one of the DoD directories.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Contact Info for Navy Resin
Ann R. Thryft   8/19/2013 1:02:43 PM
NO RATINGS
Crash55, the contact is the person interviewed in the article. I reached him through the PR contact on the USNRL press release.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Impressive details on an advanced subject matter
Ann R. Thryft   8/19/2013 1:01:17 PM
NO RATINGS
William, you're welcome. What you see here is what we were allowed to know. I understand from the source that NASA is very interested in this material, but I wasn't allowed to find out for what.

Crash55
User Rank
Iron
Contact Info for Navy Resin
Crash55   8/19/2013 9:08:57 AM
NO RATINGS
Can you share the contact at NRL for this?  I work for the Army and we have some possible applications.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Impressive details on an advanced subject matter
William K.   8/18/2013 8:02:42 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, while I don't have a use for this information today, it is certainly handy to have. This source of knowledge is a resource, and like most resources becomes reallyn valuable wnen you need it, and only "interesting" the rest of the time. I can see an immediate application of this material in high frequency hiher power RF electrical applications. 

What was not mentioned about the new material was outgassing, which affects the usefulness of a material for satellite and space applications, and also for semiconductor fabrication applications. 

So thatks for the educational article.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Impressive details on an advanced subject matter
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   8/15/2013 6:19:31 PM
NO RATINGS
ON the issue of technical writing, DN has consistently evidenced that the deeper a technical issue is, the lesser the comments.  (Case in point; this article).  But I think that should be expected; -- for example, there have been several other deep articles from Guest Bloggers that I couldn't begin to comment on. The interested field of commenters just naturally narrows.

ON the subject of RIM, I was [minimally] familiar with another industrial process – Reaction Injection Molding (a different RIM) which is [loosely translated as] an injection of a 2-part epoxy.  A very slow processing time because 'cure' is required.  Checking my old faithful resource, Wikipedia doesn't have a page for your definition of RIM but does link it to your other suggested process, Resin Transfer (RTM). 

Always interesting to learn about new things – Thanks!

Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Engineering Materials
After a year or so of missteps, false starts, retractions, and postponements, inkjet office printer giant Hewlett-Packard has finally revealed just what it plans to do in 3D printing.
The company that brought you 3D-printed eyeglasses has launched both an improved clear polymer material for 3D printing optical components and a high-speed, precision, 3D-printing process for making small- and medium-sized batches in a few days.
We've found an amazing variety of robot hands & arms in medicine, space, and service robots, as well as R&D and assembly. Some are based on industrial designs modified for speed or dexterity, while others more closely emulate human movements, as well as human size and shape.
To give engineers a better idea of the range of resins and polymers available as alternatives to other materials, this Technology Roundup presents several articles on engineering plastics that can do the job.
The first photos made with a 3D-printed telescope are here and they're not as fuzzy as you might expect. A team from the University of Sheffield beat NASA to the goal. The photos of the Moon were made with a reflecting telescope that cost the research team 100 to make (about $161 US).
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Nov 3 - 7, Engineering Principles behind Advanced User Interface Technologies
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service