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Engineering Materials

Lawrence Livermore & MIT 3D-Print New Super-Light, Super-Strong Materials

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Sci-fi all over again--not!
Ann R. Thryft   8/21/2014 11:32:51 AM
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a.saji, it all depends on how you define "printer." Gutenberg is famous for inventing the modern printing press -- defined as using mechanical moveable type, among other innovations -- in the 1400s. The Wikipedia article on him is pretty thorough. Before that, of course, there were other kinds of printing, such as wood block.

a.saji
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Re: Sci-fi all over again--not!
a.saji   8/21/2014 3:32:00 AM
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@Larry: Well it looks like it has a very rich history isn't it ? Well cant even think that printers came that early. Can I know what was the very 1st printer was ?

LarryPage
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Iron
Re: Sci-fi all over again--not!
LarryPage   8/21/2014 1:25:22 AM
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I didn't really know that printing was invented way back 1400. It has a really long history considering that computers were develop later than that. I know that I am using a good printer and a brother printer all in one so I really want to know anything about printers.

 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Quantum Leap
Ann R. Thryft   8/15/2014 12:35:59 PM
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Greg and Danyali_Ali, I agree--this is a major breakthrough in attempts at making nanoscale metamaterials.

Daniyal_Ali
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Platinum
Re: Quantum Leap
Daniyal_Ali   8/15/2014 12:18:55 PM
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Wow! That's a great breakthrough. 3D printing has opened countless new doors for every industry, and has taken us heaps of years ahead by not only generating available resources in an efficient manner but also discovering new and more powerful materials in its way. Congrats!

Greg M. Jung
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Re: Quantum Leap
Greg M. Jung   8/14/2014 11:07:53 PM
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Amazing breakthrough in material technology. Great job to the developers who had the imagination to create this new family of materials and processes.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Good for space ships
Ann R. Thryft   8/14/2014 3:32:59 PM
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Hey 78, mind-boggling, isn't it? And we thought military-grade composites were amazing back when doing those jobs. They were, of course--I agree about mission creep, although that could be expanded in general to expectations creep. Anyway, metamaterials, whether made by 3D printing or other methods, will likely become a bigger deal in future. Stay tuned for an upcoming blog on a research report on same.

78RPM
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Platinum
Good for space ships
78RPM   8/14/2014 3:13:37 PM
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Wow! They support 160,000 times their weight. Imagine that such materials were available in the 1960s -- along with plastics and microprocessors. The Atlas missiles that carried men to the moon could have been a lot smaller and cheaper.  But then mission creep and creeping elegance would probably have raised the requirements. A lot of open source opportunities and X-Prize concepts might be the ticket to the future.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Sci-fi all over again--not!
Ann R. Thryft   8/14/2014 12:38:54 PM
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The idea of new materials that can be made with additive manufacturing processes makes me think of science fiction all over again. It will be interesting to see what develops in this area during the next few years.



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