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Engineering Materials

Will Robots Give Jobs or Take Them Away?

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William K.
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Re: Those displaced jobs
William K.   11/5/2014 9:39:02 PM
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Ann, you are certainly correct that such does happen. I would point out that such behavior comes mostly from management types with poor understanding of what is needed to run a business in an ongoing success mode. That is the classic MBA way of thinking, and while it may not be fair to brand a whole segment of the community that way, overall, the brand is earned. Those who refuse to understand the value of talent will probably never be able to participate in any long-term success.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Those displaced jobs
Ann R. Thryft   11/4/2014 3:43:36 PM
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Debera, you might want to check out the second article I did in this series, called The Job Market: Robots vs. Humans, which you can find here http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=274939
There's some good info on costs.
 



Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Those displaced jobs
Ann R. Thryft   11/4/2014 3:39:45 PM
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William, I do understand what you mean about perceived value: I've seen the same thing. But I've also seen perfectly good, highly-skilled and capable people either downvalued or even laid off after the perception of their skills, talents and achievements changed. I think these are two different phenomena.

a2
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Re: Those displaced jobs
a2   10/29/2014 2:38:14 AM
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@Debera: But still robots will replace the existing ones isn't it ? So altogether it's the same again

Debera Harward
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Re: Those displaced jobs
Debera Harward   10/29/2014 2:11:07 AM
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Yes Ann, I totally agree with you that recruiters always consider employeed candidates for the job as compared to unemployed ones . Secondly  Robots taking away jobs can have a both positive and negative impact as discussed earlier it will drop down the monthly cost spent on employees but on the other hand initial one time high cost will be required .

William K.
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Re: Those displaced jobs
William K.   9/22/2014 9:21:27 PM
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Ann, it seems clear to me that in many situations the percieved value of some potential employee was far higher thannthe actual delivered value. I am not quite certain why that was true but it certainly has been true in many cases. Of course exageration of ones skills and value is certainly a common thing, unfortunately.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Those displaced jobs
Ann R. Thryft   9/22/2014 11:28:07 AM
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William, I've heard the same thing about recruiters (and other hiring agents) refusing to consider unemployed people. That's been going on forever it seems in Silicon Valley (just over the hill from me), and the practice apparently spread during the 2008-plus downturn. Regarding pay and costs, that's a moving target. If a job is highly valued, it's highly paid. Once that value changes, so does the pay. That doesn't mean those people were overpaid when their value was high. I think the phrase "whatever the market will bear" applies here.

William K.
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Those displaced jobs
William K.   9/19/2014 5:32:09 PM
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My experience is that the support of the robots is a whole lot different than the jobs that the robots are doing, so the displaced workers will either need to learn a whole lot in a hurry or find some other task to do. But the other problem is that there is a definite discrimination against those unemployed for any reason. I finally learned from one headhunter that they had specific instructions to not even submit names of those unemployed for consideration. So those jobs filled by robots are not replaced by anything comparable. 

Of course the bottom line is usually costs, and there is a different concern because many folks have demanded and receive pay much greater than the value that they deliver. Those are the "good" jobs that get automatd away, either by robots or by just plain hard automation. The benefit of the robots being that they are far more flexible, which matters in many applications. But human workers can also be very flexible, although some refuse that mode of working. Those often become a prime target for robotic replacements.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: ROBOTIC SYSTEMS AND JOBS
Ann R. Thryft   8/22/2014 12:31:45 PM
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bobjengr brings up some interesting points about both robotic precision and experienced workers. They are both addressed in at least one of the studies we'll look at in Part Two of this blog.

Debera Harward
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Re: ROBOTIC SYSTEMS AND JOBS
Debera Harward   8/17/2014 5:34:48 AM
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Bobjengr exactly this is what i meant no matter how muuch we want but it is not always possible to accomodate the experienced employees of the organisation in any department when we are moving our organisation towards Robotization.

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