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Engineering Materials

Video: Wear Your Own Pair of Robot Arms

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Rockydog
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Iron
Extra robot arms
Rockydog   7/31/2014 3:54:39 PM
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I certainly agree with this comment...    Sci-Fi comes from dreamers who re-invent the commonplace...

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: The Downside
Ann R. Thryft   7/28/2014 2:37:10 PM
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AnandY, we discussed earlier in the comments threads, and mention in the article, that these arms are definitely not designed to be prosthetic limbs. They are designed for healthy people with full use of their limbs. There are, in fact, differences in design for those two different applications. Regarding the jobs issue, you might want to check out my recent blog about robots and jobs here
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=274081

AnandY
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Gold
Re: The Downside
AnandY   7/28/2014 8:42:28 AM
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The robotic limbs are hardly a new concept since they don't differ much in their operation from the prosthetic robotic limbs that are already in production. However, while I cannot see any downside to the manufacture of the latter, I definitely have a problem with the former. Consider this statement "........helping workers in an aircraft manufacturing setting to perform difficult or complex assembly tasks that would normally require two people...." Going by that alone, it doesn't take a genius to see that if these robotic limbs are fully developed and found to be as efficient as they should be, many workers are definitely going to lose their jobs eventually. This is a downside that should be considered as well.

AnandY
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Re: ROBO ARMS
AnandY   7/28/2014 8:35:23 AM
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@bobjengr, you raise a valid point especially when it comes to the renting of the arms. In my opinion, as useful as they may be, most of us wont need them that much. In any case, people with the full use of all their limbs and who do not have any physical handicap are already used to working with just 2 arms and 2 legs. So they may only need these robotic limbs on an irregular basis just to help them that they deem would be done more efficiently orsafely with their help. For such people, renting these limbs surely makes more sense than buying them.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: A bit weird
Ann R. Thryft   7/23/2014 12:19:48 PM
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My husband--who I met after leaving that ex-boyfriend--loves science fiction as much as I do, and enjoyed comic books as much as I did. We have great fun watching sci-fi movies and then discussing them, both from the movie-making end--more his thing--and from the content/messages end--more my thing. I think comic books and science fiction have had a huge effect on our technology development, more so than we may realize.

mrdon
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Re: A bit weird
mrdon   7/23/2014 12:01:13 PM
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Ann

Good observation regarding comic books and novel graphics with connections to technology development and inspiration. The comments you made seems to fit the inspiration makeup behind the MIT's robot arms. Nice comeback with ex as well.Lol

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: A bit weird
Ann R. Thryft   7/23/2014 11:43:07 AM
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Thanks for the history of Doc Ock, mrdon. That description makes it sound even more likely to me that it may have been an inspiration for the MIT invention. In our society, popular literature includes comic books and the fancier versions now called graphic novels, as well as books, movies and TV. I remember an ex-boyfriend once saying about a movie we'd just watched, "It sucks--it's just like a comic book," to which I replied "I liked it, and I like comic books!" Notice I said "ex."

mrdon
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Re: A bit weird
mrdon   7/22/2014 9:59:21 PM
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Ann,

Doc Ock (Octavius) is a well renown Nuclear Physcists in the Spider Man comics who had an accident working on experiment wearing his robotics arm. The arms fused with his spinal cord permanently being attached to his body. During the experimental accident, his wife died during the explosion. He snapped and then became the villian Doc Ock. Short version of Doc Ock's history. I believe I have the facts, somewhat correct.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: A bit weird
Ann R. Thryft   7/22/2014 1:00:48 PM
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Liz, I don't even want to fall off a surfboard into the water although it would be a lot softer at that short distance. With the big exception of riding horses, I'd rather have my feet on the ground most of the time.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: A bit weird
Ann R. Thryft   7/22/2014 12:57:10 PM
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Good observation, mrdon. Not being familiar with that character I checked out a picture, and it sure looks like a possibility.

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