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Engineering Materials

3D-Printed Steel Building Structures

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Mechanical properties
Ann R. Thryft   7/18/2014 12:40:06 PM
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Thanks for your enthusiasm, Deberah. I enjoy bringing "amazing but true" materials and assembly stories to our readers.



Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Mechanical properties
Ann R. Thryft   7/18/2014 12:37:39 PM
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You're right, jhankwitz, it's specific parts on the SpaceX Dragon V2 that were 3D printed. OTOH, these are engine combustion chambers for the thrusters
http://3dprint.com/4740/spacex-dragon-2-3d-print/
which says a lot about the mechanical properties possible with direct metal laser sintering.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: ...and beyond properties
Ann R. Thryft   7/18/2014 12:36:51 PM
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RandD, thanks for the reminder about the process of engineering regarding new materials and assembly/construction methods. I suppose it could be summed up as "don't trust and always verify" which can only be done during the actual design process. I think of it a bit like the process called "discovery" in legal situations.

Debera Harward
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Re: Mechanical properties
Debera Harward   7/16/2014 11:48:46 AM
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No doubt this 3d printed steel should be compared with original steel and yes if the compositions and the strenght of both are same then definitely 3d printed steel is on its way towards future technology .

Debera Harward
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Re: Mechanical properties
Debera Harward   7/16/2014 11:41:34 AM
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Ann thanks alot for such an interesting post , thats really very  great and amazing to see where the technology is moving and going 3 d printing is no doubt becomming very popular and it will be one of the famous technology in future.

RandD
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Iron
Re: ...and beyond properties
RandD   7/15/2014 4:10:20 PM
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eafpres: You raise several good points, but none are new. All would have to be considered for any new material, or construction technique. I'm sure all these same points were considered when riveted aluminum was being touted for airplane fuselages. Sometimes, it's not all knowable from day one, but that doesn't mean it shouldn't be tried. It does mean adequate prudence is called for, good testing, and continuous evaluation. This is what we (Engineers) do.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: climbing 3-D printers
Ann R. Thryft   7/9/2014 12:37:12 PM
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ChasChas, I think you're ahead of the game there--great idea. This could be combined with those climbing robots that do maintenance on wind towers we wrote about

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=247655

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D Printing
Ann R. Thryft   7/9/2014 12:36:31 PM
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Hey Cadman, glad you liked this one. And yes, I sure do get that joke--glad to hear it.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Mechanical properties
Ann R. Thryft   7/7/2014 11:59:22 AM
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Regarding comparable properties of 3D-printed metals, some such studies have already been done. Some are mentioned in this article we posted by Optomec:  
http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=271188
Independent tests that actually showed better yield and tensile strength in 3D printed Ti-6Al-4V alloys used for structural components on aircraft made with Optomec's machines are discussed here
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=264842
Also, for comparison, specs for EOS' various steels and other metals, which conform to specific ASTM standards for mechanical properties and chemical composition, can be accessed here
http://www.eos.info/material-m
 



Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Mechanical properties
Ann R. Thryft   7/7/2014 11:57:45 AM
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78RPM, there aren't any existing standards for 3D printing methods, although that's the subject of several America Makes (formerly NAMII) projects, as we've reported. We've also reported on ASTM standards efforts for 3D printed parts. There certainly are existing industry standards for steel parts in the construction industry. And that's certainly true in other industries using 3D printed metal parts for end-use apps, such as aerospace, sporting equipment, and medical and dental implants.



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