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Engineering Materials

Climb Glass Walls Like a Gecko With DARPA Tech

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AnandY
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Re: Impressive stuff
AnandY   6/25/2014 3:25:47 AM
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I agree with you Ann these are the kind of innovative ideas that people want to see where technology development. We need gadgets that help make work easier. Soldiers using this kind of energy will have the ability to move faster when they carry out their missions, no need to carry all those bulky tools with such kind of technology with them. It helps in reducing risks involved in carrying out maintenance activities on tall buildings.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Spiderman
Ann R. Thryft   6/23/2014 1:19:36 PM
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Thanks, Chuck. Although I'd love to take credit, this story got a lot of coverage so it may not have been my blog that Osgood picked up.



Charles Murray
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Re: Spiderman
Charles Murray   6/20/2014 4:47:06 PM
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Your story must have drawn the attention of CBS News, Ann. I heard it on the Osgood File on June 19th.

http://osgoodfile.com/

 

 

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Spiderman
Mydesign   6/16/2014 5:51:41 AM
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"The belay rope in this test was not used, as we state in the caption. The "ladders" are part of the structure in back of the glass wall holding it up.  I'm surprised DARPA didn't do a better job of giving a photo that clearly shows this accomplishment, or better yet, a video."

Ann, just kidding I know that they are using it as back up for emergency purpose.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Impressive stuff
Ann R. Thryft   6/12/2014 1:34:35 PM
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Thanks Danyal_Ali. I think this achievement is mind-boggling. Soldiers are already carrying a lot of stuff around and don't need extra baggage, let alone the extra time and clumsiness of ropes and ladders. And that's a good point about the maintenance applications.

Daniyal_Ali
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Platinum
Impressive stuff
Daniyal_Ali   6/12/2014 1:30:01 PM
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Nice one Ann. The ropes and ladders not only take a lot of labor and time but are also very risky comparatively. If the adhesive is not having issues with a smooth glass surface then it will work perfectly fine for rough surfaces. Moreover this technology can target a very broad market, from maintenance to soldiers in combat. I know the limitations of the size but i still hope for a gecko glove which will be much more comfortable.
Anyhow, a great step forward!

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Spiderman
Ann R. Thryft   6/12/2014 12:01:22 PM
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Mydesign, I think you misunderstood the photo, which is confusing. The technology is mature, in that what we report did happen. The photo shows a test, not a real situation in an urban environment. The belay rope in this test was not used, as we state in the caption. The "ladders" are part of the structure in back of the glass wall holding it up.
I'm surprised DARPA didn't do a better job of giving a photo that clearly shows this accomplishment, or better yet, a video.



Mydesign
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Platinum
Spiderman
Mydesign   6/12/2014 6:10:54 AM
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"The DARPA-funded research that developed the polymer microstructure technology on handheld paddles is part of the agency's Z-Man program. This program aims to give soldiers in urban environments ways to scale vertical walls quickly without ropes or ladder"

Ann, the figure shows that he is using both ropes and ladders. There is no doubt that when the technology becomes matured, human beings can be climbed vertical structures as like as a spider man.

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