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Engineering Materials

10 Robots You Don't Want to Mess With

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Head Troll
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Scary?
Head Troll   8/25/2014 8:34:23 PM
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Sorry people been in robotics to long I guess humans are scarier. Nothing there even causes a twitch. Sparticus is runing a rubble bucket. Helped at enough disasters and drove enough Bobcats with it on the front. I suppose if one managed to get caught by it while closing it would leave a mark. There are bigger, badder and more intelligent robots out there and some are fully automonous, think on that.

AnandY
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Re: The Military Is Evolving With The New Robots
AnandY   6/25/2014 2:59:34 AM
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The military activities, technology and arsenals have immensely changed over time. This is towards both the positive and negative side. With the inventuion of robots majorly in the form of tanks that move in very many wheels. These robots have been programmed to rive themselves and carry very heavy loads, along with remote controlled ver4sions of earth moving machines. With these fast and efficient robots, military activities and war fares have certainly been taken to a whole new level. Being more efficient and way deadly especially during wars.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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No Big-Bang Reference-?
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   6/18/2014 11:32:51 AM
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73 comments so far, and not one single reference to Howard Wolowitz and the Big-Bang-Theory shenanigans ....

Elizabeth M
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Re: The scariest of them all?
Elizabeth M   6/17/2014 6:18:23 AM
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Yes, it's pretty incredible how technology is advancing, David Cox. The humanoid robot on the Space Station is the Robonaut. I've written about that technology and it's pretty cool.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: The scariest of them all?
Ann R. Thryft   6/13/2014 11:28:33 AM
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Thanks for the clarification, David. I got that you were referring to the huge jump in computing power and memory. My very first beat as a tech journalist back in the late 80s and early 90s was covering memory and storage, so I got to see some amazing changes and leaps forward in both.
I also agree with you about the state of robot R&D: I'm suspect those robots already exist, whether we know it or not. So does spying technology much more sophisticate than we have any idea. I wrote about that tech 10 years ago and it was capable of doing then what we now know the NSA is doing now to US citizens, i.e., spying. So imagine what NSA tech is capable of doing now.



Ann R. Thryft
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Re: The scariest of them all?
Ann R. Thryft   6/13/2014 11:27:29 AM
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I don't think spying on one's citizens is OK, Battar. I think someone needs to protect us from the NSA. So, apparently, do lots of other US citizens besides me.



Battar
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Re: The scariest of them all?
Battar   6/12/2014 1:59:35 PM
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Ann, I understand that the NSA's mandate is to protect US citizens. If that involves. the invasion of privacy of those who wish you harm, so be it. Ii am not a US citizen, and I am fully aware that some of my fellow citiztns owe their lives to the covert actions of the local secutity services.

David Cox
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Re: The scariest of them all?
David Cox   6/12/2014 1:00:37 PM
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My point in mentioning Bigdog is that four years ago, that robot had enough computing power on board to autonomously adjust its footing so it could keep its balance when pushed or when it slipped on the ice.  That is a huge real-time computing feat.  I mention the computer because your cell phone has more computing power and memory today than that 40Meg dinosaur. Our politicians have said on at least one occasion that they feel there is nothing wrong in lying directly to the American people if they feel it is for the better good and what better good is there than stopping terrorism?  Passing the Patriot Act just opened the coffers for any and every method to do so.  Autonomous killer robots with facial recognition circuitry are probably already waiting for another disaster so an enraged American people will sign off on their use. Remote controlled bulldozers or bomb sniffers don't even come close.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: The scariest of them all?
Ann R. Thryft   6/12/2014 11:54:03 AM
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David, I do remember when my desktop computer had a 40MB HD--and it was a separate peripheral. Also, some of these are not only remotely operated, but can be autonomously operated. But they don't have enough brains to make that a worrisome proposition, and I suspect it will be a very long time before they do.
We've covered Boston Dynamics and BigDog several times, including in this previous military robot slideshow:
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=242527&image_number=10
and we covered Google's purchase of Boston Dynamics here
Google Buys Boston Dynamics: Is That a Good Thing?
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=271141



Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Robot to not mess with
Ann R. Thryft   6/12/2014 11:45:43 AM
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John, I did not include robots that shoot guns or lob explosives because I don't think they're as interesting from a technical standpoint as some of these others. Good question about face recognition software and 3D cameras. AFAIK, they're not being used on any of the robots in this slideshow--if they were I would have included that info. These robots aren't designed to deal with human enemies, but with IEDs, or do surveillance tasks.



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