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Engineering Materials

RoboClam Digs Deep to Monitor Ocean Floor

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Elizabeth M
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Re: Still catching up to Mother Nature
Elizabeth M   5/8/2014 5:49:47 AM
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Ah yes, I am an East Coaster (well, close enough, the Philadelphia area) who spent summers at the Jersey Shore, so I know all about clams and things related, like clam digs and clam bakes. Didn't know the creatures were so good at digging, though, until now. You learn something new every day!

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Still catching up to Mother Nature
Ann R. Thryft   5/7/2014 11:22:56 AM
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Liz, when I first saw the headlines about a robotic clam, I thought "And it does what that we need to emulate??". Maybe that's because I'm a Californian and we don't do clam digs here like New Englanders. In any case, glad I followed it up and I'm still amazed at that 35/1 ratio of their digging ability. And yes, I remember your mussel-inspired adhesive. It was a breath of fresh air after all those gecko feet emulations I'd been reading about.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Still catching up to Mother Nature
Elizabeth M   5/7/2014 5:49:07 AM
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This is fascinating, Ann. As always, it's interesting to see where engineers and designers are getting their inspiration from in nature. It's often from an unlikely place (clams--who would've thunk it??), but always seems to be some capability that really adds value for a new application. This makes me think of an article I wrote about how the way mussels cling to rocks inspired MIT researchers to explore new adhesive materials: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=266841

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Still catching up to Mother Nature
Ann R. Thryft   5/6/2014 11:34:25 AM
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Interesting idea, Cabe. But I doubt it would be practical to adapt the technology to dry soils, since it's an underwater-based technique. The razor clam and the RoboClam infuse soil with large amounts of water to make it easier to dig through. Recreating those conditions on dry land would require huge amounts of water (like another practice I can think of), an ever-more precious and scarce resource. Digging through dry soil is just a tough job, and requires an expenditure of large amounts of resources.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Still catching up to Mother Nature
Cabe Atwell   5/5/2014 11:24:05 PM
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It begs the question of using larger versions for on-land farming or for use in quarries. 

Ann R. Thryft
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Still catching up to Mother Nature
Ann R. Thryft   5/5/2014 12:03:07 PM
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If I hadn't read the research team's paper, I would never have guessed how powerful a razor clam's digging mechanisms are (35x what it should be for its size, shape and strength). We're still imitating Mother Nature and not always surpassing her.



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