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Engineering Materials

3D Printing High-Strength Carbon Composites Using PEEK, PAEK

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Jerry dycus
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Re: High-strength materials: bring 'em on
Jerry dycus   4/16/2014 5:08:18 PM
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Hi Ann,

         The right material for the right job!!  sometimes thsat is CF.  In this case the parts weight little so the CF cost isn't much/unit.

         Now as it's strength is high you can use less material to make say a custom tube coupling or other structural part save material/cash too.

           Just CF the little weight advantage, especially when the whole product of resins, other things CF's advantage means it really needs to be worth the money, work.

             A big problem with CF is making sure the CF is wet out with resin.  In the printers case that is solved as prepreg'ed with resin of some type.  We nearly lost 4 $500k racing sailboats in the 75 Fasnet boat race because the CF was so hard to wet out.  This cost Boeing $1B and Airbus half that before they started getting good parts on the 787, etc  And still having to trash them sometimes even now.

 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D PRINTING HIGH-STRENGTH AND PEEK
Ann R. Thryft   4/16/2014 11:15:43 AM
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I think you're right about that, bobjengr: I mean the fast-growing nature of AM. As to a 3D printer that puts out graphene--well, that may not be so far away as you think. We've done at least one blog on 3D printing at the nanoscale, and graphene is mentioned in this one:
http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=269565



Ann R. Thryft
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Re: High-strength materials: bring 'em on
Ann R. Thryft   4/16/2014 11:15:14 AM
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Jerry, I know how critical you usually are about CF composites, so your comments on this technology are especially interesting. I believe these are long fibers.



bobjengr
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3D PRINTING HIGH-STRENGTH AND PEEK
bobjengr   4/15/2014 6:41:49 PM
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I think we can safely say now that "additive" manufacturing is the fastest growing technology in our country, and possibly the world, today.  There seemingly is improvement in materials every day with equipment becoming more "scalable" every year.  Even with lengthily R&D effort the time line between invention and commercialization lessens considerably each year.  I am waiting on a printer that can produce graphene; i.e. carbon based one molecule material.  That will be the day when additive manufacturing changes forever and new products become daily events.  Great post Ann.  Thank you for keeping us informed.

Jerry dycus
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Gold
Re: High-strength materials: bring 'em on
Jerry dycus   4/15/2014 6:36:07 PM
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Finally a CF product worth it!!  At least the ones with actual CF or FG continuous fibers with the printer.

Not sure how micro fibers, nanotubes, carbon or otherwise, etc NM's long help the strength anymore than say silicon oxide crystals from ground  glass, etc.  In them it's the resin that is more important.

This printer especially using FG could make some very, very strong yet light things.  And because they would be so strong it can be made thinner, using less printer time, materials for printer usable parts.

So about 3 yrs these should be cost effective is going to make a lot of large corporations wonder where their customers went that will allow locals to make near everything for less.

You don't have to make everything on it, just use it for hard to make parts or molds, tooling, custom connectors, etc.

Life is going to be interesting over the next 15 yrs nearly everything will be done differently, mostly locally cutting out corporations, distribitors,  etc parasites to the makers selling directly to the consumers, both saving that for themselves and better customer service lacking now.

 

Ann R. Thryft
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High-strength materials: bring 'em on
Ann R. Thryft   4/14/2014 1:34:11 PM
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3D printing materials keep expanding, and carbon composites are now available from several sources. These high-strength materials, though, are relatively new to the game.

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