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Engineering Materials

Slideshow: More Seismic Shifts in 3D Printing Materials

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: PRINTING MATERIALS
Ann R. Thryft   4/4/2014 3:09:47 PM
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You're welcome bobjengr. Interesting questions about material feed. The answer may be in the info at the links we give.

bobjengr
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PRINTING MATERIALS
bobjengr   4/2/2014 5:58:26 PM
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I think "additive" manufacturing is one of the fastest growing technologies in the scientific and manufacturing community today.  The video was excellent and even though as a fairly simple "tweezer" design; it points to a multiple possibilities relative to additional components.  I can think of several in the medical field.  Let me ask a question:  are the materials blended into rods or coils and then fed into the printer?  Is this the way the material is distributed in the process?  Thank you Ann for keeping us up to date on what's happening with rapid prototyping.  

 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Combining 3D Materials for Different Properties
Ann R. Thryft   3/31/2014 11:10:46 AM
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Greg, thanks for that comment. I'm with you--I think multiple materials 3D printing is one of the most important aspects of the technology.



Greg M. Jung
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Combining 3D Materials for Different Properties
Greg M. Jung   3/30/2014 10:26:32 PM
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I was especially impressed by the ability to combine multiple 3D materials to create different physical properties.  I truly believe that this is a significant breakthrough and that this technique will become more and more common as 3D printing technology continues to advance.  This ability will be a very valuable option for the printing of future designs.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D printed ice
Ann R. Thryft   3/28/2014 11:51:16 AM
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You're welcome, William. But the problem with comparing what we can do now to Star Trek replicators is, they created food and drink and tools and whatnot out of, well, we don't know. Presumably pure energy or something. But today, to get 3D-printed chocolate or other food output, you have to already have that food as a material for the machine.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D printed ice
Ann R. Thryft   3/28/2014 11:50:33 AM
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a2, sadly, this 3D-printed ice isn't a 3D-printed food, so there aren't any flavors. It's not edible: it's used for building things, as the article states. 

William K.
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Re: 3D printed ice
William K.   3/28/2014 10:42:00 AM
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It appears that we may actually be at only the beginning of the wave of game changing creations as far as the 3D printing concept goes. Now I am anticipating the creation of actual "replicators", like those on the Star Trek series. At this point it is difficult to imagine what may not happen, given the wide realm of new processes and equipments. 

Thanks for another informative post, Ann

a2
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Re: 3D printed ice
a2   3/27/2014 10:26:49 PM
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@Ann: Indeed and all of a sudden it came as a surprise. Anyway wondering about the flavors this can have

Ann R. Thryft
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3D printed ice
Ann R. Thryft   3/27/2014 1:15:31 PM
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The 3D-printed ice is my favorite. Who knew the Canadians had been doing this so long?

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