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Engineering Materials

3D-Printing an Entire Car & a Bigger, Faster Commercial 3D Printer

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: MDF, 3D printing, and carbon composites
Ann R. Thryft   4/4/2014 2:56:38 PM
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Cadman, good to see your photo after all this time.
I don't think it will take many decades, maybe just one decade. But that assumption depends on a lot of things staying constant out there in the world, doesn't it? Meanwhile, we're not printing cars and buildings in any kind of volume. Actual changes in materials & assembly technologies tend to take a long time because the new materials and techniques have to be integrated into complex existing systems.

Cadman-LT
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Re: MDF, 3D printing, and carbon composites
Cadman-LT   4/4/2014 1:49:32 PM
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Ann, think about it. Just a few years ago they were printing ...say candles and stuff....now it's cars and buildings...lol You say decades I say a couple years. It might take awhile, but I do not think decades. The only reason that it won't happen faster is that the machines that make our stuff are expensive, very expensive, but eventually they will be replaced.

Cadman-LT
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Re: MDF, 3D printing, and carbon composites
Cadman-LT   4/4/2014 1:43:16 PM
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Ann, I know. You might be right. A few decades though...hehe I doubt that. I'm sure it will happen and I don't think it will take that long. You and I have been talking about this for only a couple years and look at what has happened! You really , honestly , think it will take decades? I do not. But maybe, they'll need people to keep them in service.....way different than being a machinist though.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: exciting times ahead for additive mfg
Ann R. Thryft   3/18/2014 12:09:50 PM
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RogueMoon, I agree with you--I don't see how this will get rid of machinists. If anything, this technology can supplement what they do. Industrial 3D printing is still a tech--machines and materials and designs combined--that requires techs to run it, at least for making cars. Eventually I'd guess it could be automated, but that's also in the future.



Trenth
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Re: exciting times ahead for additive mfg
Trenth   3/17/2014 6:53:15 PM
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This is exciting, this is amazing tech.  





My only concern with the national labs using our tax dollar to this research, is that they will then turn around and sell it to the big companies, locking in the big company advantage and preempting the individual and small company inventors.  





The big companies also are the ones who can afford the cost of applying for the contracts and complying with the rules. We long ago remove the small business incentives for them.









If it's made with our taxes, it should be available to every citizen and profit the country.  

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: MDF, 3D printing, and carbon composites
Ann R. Thryft   3/17/2014 1:02:58 PM
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Cadman-LT, I don't think this will be the demise of machinists. Or at least it will take a very long time, like a few decades.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: MDF, 3D printing, and carbon composites
Ann R. Thryft   3/17/2014 1:01:56 PM
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Cadman-LT you have a good memory. But that was ages ago. Now ORNL talks about what they're doing at least some of the time, although I get the impression it's way after the fact. I think their current state of the art is way beyond whatever they're admitting to.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: MDF, 3D printing, and carbon composites
Ann R. Thryft   3/17/2014 1:00:55 PM
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Thanks, Chuck. I've heard of the Urbee. 3D printing has been used for high-end sportscars and race cars, but it hasn't gotten near production of mass vehicle models. At least, not yet!

bronorb
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Re: exciting times ahead for additive mfg
bronorb   3/17/2014 10:54:05 AM
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Good points Roguemoon. Machinists will be, and are, very much in demand. Go into any machine shop and the average age is somewhere around 50 years old. Someone has to step up and take over for these guys when they retire.

On a related note, this technology shift is a perfect example of why we need to put more money into our public K-12 technical education system. Young people need to experience all aspects of manufacturing early so that they can figure out where they might fit in.

And, BTW, ALL kids need to be exposed to this, not just the kids in charter schools.

The manufacturing roles in the future will require more technical expertise and with public K-12 budgets being slashed, Tech Ed. is being put on the back burner. We are going to be hurtin' for certain.

Awile
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Iron
Add, subtract, or reshape?
Awile   3/17/2014 10:51:35 AM
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I'm not a mechanical guy, so help me understand the economics here.  I understand the value of adddive (guided deposition) and subtractive (guided removal) for making complex parts in low volume.  

How would the side panels for a 3D-printed car be made?

For high volume won't molding and stamping still win?  Both have a cost of developing the mold or die, but would seem to be much more efficient for volume production.  Where is the cross-over?

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