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Engineering Materials

Sabic Brings Carbon Composites to Medical Devices

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Sriram Mohan
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Iron
Composites for Medical Devices
Sriram Mohan   8/25/2014 4:22:37 AM
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Hi,

This was a nice article, do you an idea for the market size of Medical Composites? I beleive it wont be more than US$650 million. Do you have any info to share?

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: I shoulda guess
Ann R. Thryft   2/26/2014 1:41:24 PM
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Thanks, Liz. It seems like a no-brainer once you see the reasoning.



Elizabeth M
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Re: I shoulda guess
Elizabeth M   2/26/2014 4:58:11 AM
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As you have presented it, Ann, I completely agree. It makes a lot more sense once you learn more about it. Well done for presenting this so clearly.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: FDA approved, but food grade?
Ann R. Thryft   2/24/2014 11:05:39 AM
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TJ, the carbon composites are medical-grade materials, not food- grade materials, designed for less than 29 days of contact with the body. The other, non-carbon composite materials--ULTEM resin--used in the sterilization tray are for surgical instruments. That's not a food-grade material either.



Ann R. Thryft
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Re: I shoulda guess
Ann R. Thryft   2/24/2014 11:03:39 AM
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Elizabeth, I had a similar "what?!" response on seeing the press release about the carbon composites and brought that question to the interview. It does make sense from both the materials perspective and the application POV.



Ann R. Thryft
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Re: ULTEM
Ann R. Thryft   2/24/2014 11:02:42 AM
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Glad this was useful for you, Greg.

TJ McDermott
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FDA approved, but food grade?
TJ McDermott   2/24/2014 10:02:23 AM
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While the FDA may have approved these materials for use to sterilize surgical instruments, are the materials rated for food contact?

Elizabeth M
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Re: I shoulda guess
Elizabeth M   2/24/2014 4:37:05 AM
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Interesting story on the new materials being used in medical devices and the reasoning behind it. It's not a material I would've thought would have this application, either, Ann, but your article presents very clearly why it is working so well.

Greg M. Jung
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Platinum
ULTEM
Greg M. Jung   2/21/2014 10:41:01 PM
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Good information on the ability to sterilize the ULTEM polymer and I will keep this in mind for future applications.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
I shoulda guessed
Ann R. Thryft   2/21/2014 3:31:42 PM
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Maybe I shouldn't have been surprised at this development, but somehow I never thought of carbon composites as useful in medical applications. The truth is, there are lots of machines and equipment of various types that can benefit from this material.



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