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Engineering Materials

First 3D-Printed Metal Part Flies on UK Military Jet

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Mydesign
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Re: 3D-printed metal aircraft for Britain's Royal Air Force
Mydesign   3/5/2014 5:05:25 AM
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"You are welcome, Mydesign. Keep those good questions coming!"

Sure Ann. Thanks for your patience.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D-printed metal aircraft for Britain's Royal Air Force
Ann R. Thryft   3/4/2014 1:37:36 PM
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You are welcome, Mydesign. Keep those good questions coming!



Mydesign
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Re: 3D-printed metal aircraft for Britain's Royal Air Force
Mydesign   3/4/2014 10:19:35 AM
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Thanks Ann for the details and Link. These links are very useful and helpful to know various standards and metrics.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D-PRINTING AND THE UK
Ann R. Thryft   2/24/2014 11:23:48 AM
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bobjengr, you're welcome. From what I read, it looks like the RAF did, indeed, use non-critical parts first in their development project.



Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D-printed metal aircraft for Britain's Royal Air Force
Ann R. Thryft   2/24/2014 11:21:36 AM
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Mydesign, in case you didn't see this blog on America Makes (the old NAMII) funding its second wave of AM projects
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=271460
you might be interested to know that some are aimed at establishing various metrics for ensuring the quality, accuracy and reproducibility of parts made with various AM processes. There's also standards work being done at the ASTM, as we reported here
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=269675
We're getting there.

bobjengr
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3D-PRINTING AND THE UK
bobjengr   2/22/2014 5:04:45 PM
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 I think we are seeing proof-positive of the advantages of 3-D printing with various applications of the technology.  I feel the "sky is the limit" for addititive manufacturing and the processes involved.  As Ann has demonstrated with previous posts, the size of equipment has improved considerably and most importantly, advancements in materials are significant with improvements in shear stress, tensile stress and temperature limits.  I'm sure the UK initially used parts that were non mission-critical to prove the applications.  When convinced, they then moved to applications requiring a higher level of confidence and better MTTF (mean time to failure).  Excellent post Ann and thank you for keeping us up to date.  

Mydesign
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Re: 3D-printed metal aircraft for Britain's Royal Air Force
Mydesign   2/3/2014 6:10:23 AM
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"only some things can be manufactured faster using additive manufacturing/3D printing processes. That's not at all true on the low-value, high volume end of production. The truth is in the details. We've covered this topic extensively in DN; you might want to check out the links at the end of this article."

Ann, Thanks for the clarification. Actually I meant about quality and standardization of the printed objects.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D-printed metal aircraft for Britain's Royal Air Force
Ann R. Thryft   1/21/2014 12:01:20 PM
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Mydesign, only some things can be manufactured faster using additive manufacturing/3D printing processes. That's not at all true on the low-value, high volume end of production. The truth is in the details. We've covered this topic extensively in DN; you might want to check out the links at the end of this article.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D printed parts in action
Ann R. Thryft   1/21/2014 11:57:57 AM
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RogueMoon, thanks for your comment about Moore's Law--it's totally right on. I'm not the only one who's been saying for some time that those expectations have been misapplied to all sorts of things the so-called Law doesn't apply to. Even Moore said it wasn't a law, just an observation. And that observation was made about memory chips, not even other kinds of chips. It's got nothing to do with other technologies.

Mydesign
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Re: Military Usage
Mydesign   1/21/2014 1:16:15 AM
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"even we can now print 3d printed objects which never existed as well . That is we can print anything we want and which is our requirment without any limition of anything ."

Debera, that's too may be right. if ideas and requirement is there anything can be get printed.

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