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Engineering Materials

NASA Tests 3D-Printed Rocket Engine Part

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: New dimensions to 3D printing
Ann R. Thryft   8/8/2013 12:41:54 PM
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Mydesign, I'm pretty sure 3D printing--or more likely, other forms of AM--isn't used in avionics. But it's definitely been used in aerospace for quite awhile. While much of this is prototyping, some is actually end-use parts. You might want to check out our site's aerospace section--go to the bar with white letters on black background above this comments area, and click on the pull-down menu "Aerospace." Then check out my stories for the last year or so and you'll find some that address this topic.

AnandY
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RE: University ties
AnandY   8/8/2013 3:26:52 AM
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I agree with Ann completely. The partnership between universities and the corporate firms serve to improve the quality of the research made. The universities get the required funds for their research while the firms get fresh and fine minds to aid with their developments.

Mydesign
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Re: New dimensions to 3D printing
Mydesign   8/8/2013 1:26:55 AM
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"3D printing of metals has been around for a long time, relatively speaking, in aerospace and defense, so the technology may not be growing quite as fast as you think. It's not clear to me--nor can I get anyone to tell me directly--why or how it's been possible to improve performance to the point where we can build rocket engines using the technology. I get the impression that it's mostly evolution, like in any other technology."

Ann, am working in avionics and space technology, but so far I never heard of 3D printing in this domain. Am trying to explore more on similar technology, so that if possible, deploy such solutions.



Ann R. Thryft
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Re: New dimensions to 3D printing
Ann R. Thryft   8/7/2013 3:25:23 PM
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mr_bandit, I was planning on addressing the patent expiration issue in an upcoming blog--thanks for the info and additional ideas!

mr_bandit
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Iron
Re: New dimensions to 3D printing
mr_bandit   8/7/2013 3:18:53 PM
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On the 3d metal printing patents expiring:


1. The current patent holders have an experience edge. I think they will come out with new printers, at both the low and high end. The differentiators (my guess) are the materials and the resolution.

2. New folks will enter the field, including the hacker/DIY (ie Rip-Rap) and turn-key folks (ie Type A Machines) although it may take them a year or two because of funding - look to Indigogo and Kickstarter for host projects.

3. An obvious source of the low-end designs are the MechE/CS/EE students at universities. 3D metal printers will make *excellent* student projects, because they will require cross-skilled teams. I suspect there might even be national competitions hosted by IEEE or similar groups.

Read "Makers" by Cory Doctorow - a fantastic thought experiment (as all good SF is) on the effects of cheap 3D printers of all sorts.

Exciting times!

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: New dimensions to 3D printing
Ann R. Thryft   8/7/2013 2:11:11 PM
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mr_bandit, there's been some press recently about the upcoming expiration of patents for SLS 3D printing of metals. These printers already exist, at the high end--it's most likely the low end where they will become a lot more common. That could change the game quite a bit.

mr_bandit
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Iron
Re: New dimensions to 3D printing
mr_bandit   8/6/2013 6:41:46 PM
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The basic patents for 3D printing - including some for metal - will expire in 2014. I suspect folks are working on printers using those techniques so they are ready for sale when the patents expire.

The biggest change is in 5..10 years it will be possible to 3d print all major organs using the patient's own cells, eleminating rejection. )The only exception is the brain, but there are a lot of folks around that don't seem to miss having one. Mostly they are known as managers and politicians. :^)

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: New dimensions to 3D printing
Ann R. Thryft   8/6/2013 12:14:50 PM
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Mydesign, your comment about 3D printing humans is very funny. It is true, as we've pointed out elsewhere http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1394&doc_id=256836 that body parts are being 3D printed, although so far they're mostly non-working prototypes. The 3D printed kidney mentioned in the Design News article--which was printed during a TED talk using living cells--is not yet working, but the same institution--Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine--has developed its own modified 3D printer to produce organ and tissue prototypes. Here's the TED talk link: http://www.ted.com/talks/anthony_atala_printing_a_human_kidney.html Here are some links from the Institute: http://www.wakehealth.edu/Research/WFIRM/Our-Story/Inside-the-Lab/Bioprinting.htm http://www.wakehealth.edu/Research/WFIRM/Projects/Replacement-Organs-and-Tissue.htm

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: New dimensions to 3D printing
Ann R. Thryft   8/6/2013 12:14:09 PM
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Mydesign, 3D printing of metals has been around for a long time, relatively speaking, in aerospace and defense, so the technology may not be growing quite as fast as you think. It's not clear to me--nor can I get anyone to tell me directly--why or how it's been possible to improve performance to the point where we can build rocket engines using the technology. I get the impression that it's mostly evolution, like in any other technology.

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: New dimensions to 3D printing
Mydesign   8/5/2013 11:51:16 PM
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"There's a lot going on with 3D printing of metals, more than most people know, since these companies have been very quiet compared to the hobbyist end machines that use plastics."

Ann, 3D printing about Metals!! If technology will able to develop/grow at this rate, within a decade we can expect 3D printing of any objects, including human being.

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