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GE Aviation Cuts 3D Print Time in LEAP Engine

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: The ramifications
Ann R. Thryft   6/14/2013 12:26:02 PM
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Thanks, Rob, I wasn't aware of that about Google and the WSJ. That *is* odd.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: The ramifications
Rob Spiegel   6/14/2013 12:50:09 AM
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Ann, you may have clicked on a link that went through Google. Google makes the WSJ available to everyone. Don't know how they can do it without getting sued. Maybe they have an agreement. But that wouldn't make sense, giving away their product through Google.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: The ramifications
Ann R. Thryft   6/13/2013 8:11:12 PM
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That's funny, Rob, I had no problem accessing that article and I don't subscribe to the WSJ. It might be because I clicked on a link in a different article that took me there. Anyway, thanks for the Car Connection article. The information is pretty widely distributed on the web.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: The ramifications
Rob Spiegel   6/13/2013 1:34:19 PM
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Good points Ann. I remember the dental application article. The WSJ article about Ford is not available to non-subscribers, but the Car Connection had an item on it:

http://www.thecarconnection.com/news/1084694_with-3d-printing-ford-brings-products-to-market-faster

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: The ramifications
Ann R. Thryft   6/12/2013 6:45:55 PM
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Clinton, I know what you mean. I've seen the same tendency and it baffles me. Thanks for the positive feedback. I guess it's like a lot of other major changes nor revolutions--it takes time to sink in.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: The ramifications
Ann R. Thryft   6/12/2013 6:43:43 PM
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Rob, there are many medical devices being made already with 3D printing, but the materials tend to be quite different. They're not usually metals. Here's a recent article I did on 3D printing of models for dental labs: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=261369 But stay tuned for the June materials feature on 3D printed dental models and appliances, some of them using metals. Also, 3D printing is already used in automobile manufacturing. Ford has been making a big deal about this recently: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323372504578469560282127852.html

CLMcDade
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Re: The ramifications
CLMcDade   6/12/2013 2:20:24 PM
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Hi Ann,

It is interesting - if one reads the comments across the Design News articles having to do with 3D printing, there is almost always disbelief that it is already being used in production of not only plastic parts, but also metal parts.

Just two weeks ago, a commenter argued that the 3D rapid prototype gun was a fictional article perpetuated by the pro gun-control media or some such nonsense.  So keep reporting on the applications - at some point it will sink in with us.

 

Clinton

Rob Spiegel
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Re: The ramifications
Rob Spiegel   6/12/2013 1:21:43 PM
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I'll bet there are medical devices that could benefit from this type of specially manufactured part. It probably wouldn't add much to mass produced products such as automobiles.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: The ramifications
Ann R. Thryft   6/11/2013 8:35:46 PM
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Cabe, we're talking all direct manufacturing here of end-products, not prototypes. I rarely write about prototypes or models anymore when it comes to 3D printing--there's too much real production going on.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: The ramifications
Cabe Atwell   6/11/2013 4:59:16 PM
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Is that the printer makes useable in the real world? Or is it still just for prototypes?

C

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