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Engineering Materials

Bioplastic's Algae Content Raised to 51% for Injection Molding

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NadineJ
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Re: Black is powerful default color
NadineJ   6/3/2013 6:01:15 PM
True, Ford was an excellent businessman who also had good luck.  He was more than a tyrant at work though.

Similar to Coco Chanel in occupied France, he's landed on the wrong side of history.  I acknowledge his good business sense but I can't celebrate him.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: What triggers Decomposition-?
Ann R. Thryft   6/3/2013 5:54:51 PM
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JimT, bioplastics are all produced as an alternative to petro-based plastics: to decrease carbon footprint and to form a sustainable alternative. Only some of them are made to be biodegradable or compostable (which are not the same thing). For more details, I suggest you check out the feature article I did on the subject last year: Bioplastics Become Cost Competitive http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=239662

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: What triggers Decomposition-?
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   6/3/2013 4:05:05 PM
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OK, Ann – thanks for that distinction.  I was thinking that this material was intended to fully break down, after some predetermined time.  SO, that's not the case ,,,, 

This Algae based material then, was created in the spirit of "naturally sourced ingredients" as opposed to the "petroleum by-product" era of plastics?

If that's the case, then still a very worthwhile effort, especially considering the eventuality of complete depletion of petroleum products in the far predicted future.  Industry certainly will benefit from this foundation.

But does this stuff break down at all -?  -- or does it last virtually forever, just like petroleum resin-?

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: Black is powerful default color
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   6/3/2013 3:53:26 PM
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Reading between the lines of your Henry Ford comment, I recognize what a tyrant he was in many corporate dealings.  But I could never deny his spot in history as a pioneer in Industrial engineering.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: Black is powerful default color
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   6/3/2013 3:50:40 PM
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Right, Ann –High flow capability is a benefit that most experienced plastic designers must have.  Had the advancement of Bioplast been realized without thin wall capabilities, many designers would have been forced to seek other materials, even tho' they would love to utilize this "green" option for obvious reasons.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Black is powerful default color
Ann R. Thryft   5/31/2013 1:09:48 PM
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Henry Ford can be considered a visionary when it comes to inventing the modern, automated production line. The fact that, only at first, he narrowed color choice to a single color (black) was a tactic that helped get the whole system off the ground and a lot of the basic details worked out without worrying about nonessentials. Later, once the production system became stable, car color choice was expanded. Similar principles are used when first manufacturing new technologies. In the case of algae-based bioplastics, though, color choice can't be expanded. The Sustainables line, which includes this one, targets automotive, consumer electronics, and packaging.



a.saji
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Re: Bioplastics, resin from algae
a.saji   5/31/2013 1:18:56 AM
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@William: Looks yucky to me but anyway on your question on energy, I don't think it will be such an issue. It will consume some energy but not in a big way.  

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Black is powerful default color
Ann R. Thryft   5/30/2013 7:21:20 PM
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JimT, thanks for mentioning the advantage of thin-walled characteristics in IM. That's one of the reasons I wanted to write about this one, and one of things that impressed me about it, too: 51% algae content AND a plastic durable enough for thin-walled IM apps? Wow!

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Bioplastics, resin from algae
William K.   5/30/2013 4:01:39 PM
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It seems that we are shown the algae because it looks much more interesting than the resin product, which I would expect. 

But I wonder about the stages of that conversion and how much energy is required to do the conversion. Also, what is the process? That would be a very interesting writeup indeed.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: What triggers Decomposition-?
Ann R. Thryft   5/30/2013 12:57:51 PM
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JimT, I think you're thinking of a different grade of bioplastics, made for plastic bags, and/or made to be compostable, although only under certain conditions. That's a completely different form from this stuff, which is a durable type. We delineate this in a previous article on Cereplast (first link in the Related posts list):
Cereplast's Sustainables resins combine high bio-based content with traditional plastic's durability and endurance. They are targeted to applications in industries such as automotive, consumer electronics, and packaging. The company's other product line, its Compostables resins, are aimed at single-use applications, such as food service products.
We also cover the general subject here:
Bioplastics Become Cost Competitive
http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=239662

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