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Green Power Breaks Records in the West

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Mydesign
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Natural Resources
Mydesign   5/10/2013 6:19:04 AM
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"This spring, the state's wind power is setting energy generation records and solar energy generation is expected to rise sharply during the second half of 2013. Arizona has also set records in energy generated from solar power. If past trends are any indication, this may be a hint of the future in other parts of the US."

Ann, that's good news and there is no doubt that natural resources are going to be the only source in future for power generation.



Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Natural Resources
Ann R. Thryft   5/10/2013 1:00:28 PM
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Mydesign, many people would agree with you. However, those making profits in the oil & gas industry are fighting back and trying to overturn state-level Renewable Portfolio Standards, and in some cases, have succeeded:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/heather-taylormiesle/the-bullies-are-bringing_b_2791970.html



Cabe Atwell
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Re: Natural Resources
Cabe Atwell   5/10/2013 5:35:37 PM
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To pay back the cost of solar or renewables, take around 10 years. This is a great effort. But the ROI is slow.

C

patb2009
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Gold
Re: Natural Resources
patb2009   5/10/2013 8:41:46 PM
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if the payback were that long, 

the investment wouldn't be that large.

 

Totally_Lost
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Silver
Re: Natural Resources
Totally_Lost   5/11/2013 9:57:34 AM
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I like the "import" class, and where did coal and gas go? Then put this into perspective http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_power_stations_in_California

And then realize there are also days like this (no storage): http://content.caiso.com/green/renewrpt/20130104_DailyRenewablesWatch.pdf

It's likely political pressure will shutdown Diablo sometime soon, as the special interests important in election cycles demand payback.

With fewer coal and gas plants to pickup the peak production during the long hot summer, expect rolling blackouts again if hydro becomes scarce with a dry year.

It will not take an Enron next time, with base generation being scaled back, and demands continue to grow with population growth.

patb2009
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Gold
Re: Natural Resources
patb2009   5/12/2013 12:10:43 AM
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and there are days like this

http://content.caiso.com/green/renewrpt/20120704_DailyRenewablesWatch.pdf

it's about 12 percent coming from  renewables,  

at the rate of growth, in the summer you may see that go to 33% and then 50% in a hot peak day.

 

Somewhat like how Germany is at 25% nowadays, all the time.

 

Totally_Lost
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Silver
Re: Natural Resources
Totally_Lost   5/12/2013 8:06:06 PM
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Until the storage problem is fixed, base line coal will continued to be required, and peak gas plants will continue to be required.

The current policy will sooner or later, cause base line coal and peak gas plants not to be built with population growth.

There will come a hot summer day that is cloudy and still, without solar/wind power, and there will be rolling blackouts.

If they do somehow keep building base/peak plants to meet worst case loads, then the people of Calif will be paying triple or worse for their power.

Calif solar/wind is expensive ... building base/peak to match population growth is expensive.

Until the cheap storage problem is fixed ... the renewable incentives are just going to keep charging Calif rate payers triple for infrastructure that does only half the job.

And if solar and wind carry the load successfully for some entire summer ... the folks working the coal/gas plants are going to be laid off and find some other job ... and when the still cloudy days arrive, the coal/gas plants will be cold and unstaffed.

Or rate payers are going to have to pay for an idle plant with full staff salaries on top of expensive renewables.

the coal and gas produce CO2 for global warming, and particulates that cause health problems. Babies die, children die, adults die. Add to that the mess for fossil fuel transportation, and more people die.

How many is enough?

How many?

patb2009
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Gold
Re: Natural Resources
patb2009   5/12/2013 11:09:17 PM
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John

your thought processes are caught in the 20th century

Totally_Lost
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Silver
Re: Natural Resources
Totally_Lost   5/13/2013 1:35:09 AM
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Sorry patB .... they are hardly stuck at all


This is my last post on this blog topics discussion thread, but it's not the end of the discussion, which will be moved to another venue. This is clearly the wrong forum for moving forward technical solutions that advance the state of the art toward the goal of reducing fossil fuel death and illness.

http://www.articlegarden.com/Article/The-Person-Who-Says-It-Can-t-Be-Done-Should-Never-Interrupt-The-Person-Who-Is-Doing-It/44644

And while there may be many posts after this one, I can assure you that the last words on this topic will remain as follows:

How many more must die from fossil fuels?

How many more?


Elizabeth M
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Re: Natural Resources
Elizabeth M   5/13/2013 4:45:09 AM
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This is really promising news! Would be great if the rest of the country could follow, especially Midwestern states where there is a lot of wind, as well. California and Arizona are lucky to get so much sunshine, but in the summer months much of the rest of the country could really harness solar power more as well, and as storage improves, that energy could be stored up to use in the darker months. Thanks for covering this, Ann! It's great to see the adoption of alternative energy on the rise in these places.

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