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Engineering Materials

3D Printing & Robots at MD&M West

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NadineJ
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Platinum
More please!
NadineJ   2/26/2013 12:56:47 PM
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Thanks for another informative article Ann!  The links are great.  I'd really like to see more in the slide show. 

Robots with Common Sense made in the USA.  Now, that's something new.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: More please!
Ann R. Thryft   2/26/2013 3:15:23 PM
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Glad you enjoyed my report, Nadine. Actually there's been a lot of intelligent robot design here in the US, but much of it's been aimed at military or rescue robots. Some's also been done in industrial robots, but not with the specific goal of a robot like Baxter. I'm really interested to see what developers do with the SDK.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Bone rasp or industrial tool?
Ann R. Thryft   2/26/2013 5:41:27 PM
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My husband just told me he showed this article to one of the guys at work, who said the bone rasp looks like a diamond studded borer used in industrial mining. I've been avoiding thinking about what this femur borer actually does, but--Ouch!

Greg M. Jung
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Medical Applications
Greg M. Jung   2/26/2013 6:13:37 PM
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Didn't realize that 3D printing for medical applications are over 30 percent and trending upward.  It makes sense because 3D printing is a great fit for creating individualized, custom parts out of titanitum at a reasonable cost and with a rapid turn-around time.

Charles Murray
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Re: Bone rasp or industrial tool?
Charles Murray   2/26/2013 7:21:36 PM
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I actually thought the bone rasp looked like a medieval weapon, Ann.

Tim
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Platinum
Baxter Robot
Tim   2/26/2013 10:24:47 PM
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I can see a lot of applications where the Baxter robot can be used in assembly line application. The robot can handle the arduous task of picking and placing a part for the operator to complete some fine assembly work like fitting tight tolerance components together. The operator can then safely hand the part to another robot for assemnbly or packout.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Baxter Robot
Elizabeth M   2/27/2013 5:18:04 AM
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Enjoyed your firsthand account of Baxter, Ann. Sounds like "he" behaves as the company said he would, but I guess the proof of his usefulness on the factory floor will be in the pudding. Generally he sounds quite impressive, though!

Elizabeth M
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Re: Bone rasp or industrial tool?
Elizabeth M   2/27/2013 5:21:18 AM
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Yes, the photo of the femur bone rasp is seriously daunting! Looks more like a weapon for a scifi superhero than a doctor...hopefully patients are under heavy anesthesia before something like this is used on them. The innovations in fabrication of the tool are quite impressive, though.

eafpres
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Gold
3D additive mfg of titanium
eafpres   2/27/2013 11:18:37 AM
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Hi Ann--Baxter has gotten a lot of attention since it was rolled out.  I wonder about the ultimate safety in a real environment.  To do its job it has to learn some places or zones where it expects "parts" and everywhere else would be an exception so the sensors can stop it.  If your body is where a part should be, how does it know the difference?

I can imagine a learning process where the entire profile of motion, including all 3D forces and accelerations are recorded and stored, and some threshold set to that if during the entire operation a threshold is exceeded it stops.  I don't know if that is more or less what they are doing.  Even if that is true, a human has to set the thresholds in the learned profile, and production engineers being human, will tend to set the thresholds to eliminate any false alarms.  That opens the door to injury.

Do you have any deeper insight into how Baxter will always know the difference between work and a human?

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Medical Applications
Ann R. Thryft   2/27/2013 11:30:13 AM
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Greg, I knew medical and dental was a major app area but not that it had reached such a high percentage. I agree, it makes total sense. The reduction in cost per item of a titanium device is what amazed me the most.



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