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Engineering Materials
Slideshow: 3D Printing Will Go to Mars
9/13/2012

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Unmanned aerial vehicle manufacturers such as Honeywell are using 3D laser sintering to make a multitude of parts and subsystems, including engine housings, fuel tanks, and fuselages. The vehicle, its parts, and its payload can be changed quickly for different customers or different missions. Paramount, a 3D Systems company, has made parts for Honeywell's T-Hawk Micro Air Vehicle. The British Army has adopted the T-Hawk MAV for use in Afghanistan, and the US Army is using it for its Future Combat Systems Class I UAV. The parts are made with Paramount's high-temperature laser sintering process. Its materials can be processed at 380 C, are naturally nonflammable, and don't outgas. (Source: Honeywell)
Unmanned aerial vehicle manufacturers such as Honeywell are using 3D laser sintering to make a multitude of parts and subsystems, including engine housings, fuel tanks, and fuselages. The vehicle, its parts, and its payload can be changed quickly for different customers or different missions. Paramount, a 3D Systems company, has made parts for Honeywell's T-Hawk Micro Air Vehicle. The British Army has adopted the T-Hawk MAV for use in Afghanistan, and the US Army is using it for its Future Combat Systems Class I UAV. The parts are made with Paramount's high-temperature laser sintering process. Its materials can be processed at 380 C, are naturally nonflammable, and don't outgas.
(Source: Honeywell)

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anelinamartin
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Re: Fascinating
anelinamartin   6/11/2013 4:43:04 AM
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As we all know printers are the good source for data collection. Its a good step . Don't know what about the performance testing of printer on mars but. Its a good step. 

Elizabeth M
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Re: Fascinating
Elizabeth M   3/6/2013 7:03:21 AM
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Just had a look on this story for one I'm writing now about a 3D-printed lunar base...this is pretty amazing and I'm continuously impressed by what NASA and space scientists are devising. Just the idea of being a space scientist in and of itself is quite cool! I do hope NASA can pull some of this stuff off despite its financial woes. I suppose the influx of commercial influence and funds will help. Perhaps it's a bit frivolous and not necessarily for the benefit of mankind in general to have such high space aspriations, but I like it anyway. :)

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: LCA for the Universe?
Ann R. Thryft   9/27/2012 12:14:08 PM
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Rob_Krebs, glad you're enjoying the slideshow. I think that's a good point about what CAD designs to bring and transmitting the files you forgot by wireless comms. LCA and environmental impacts in space? We don't seem to have done much on that end yet, considering how much space junk we've left out there. Thanks--your points are well taken, although first we've got to actually build some of these things.

Rob_Krebs
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LCA for the Universe?
Rob_Krebs   9/26/2012 3:21:34 PM
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Thank you Anne Thryt for this amazing article. Brilliant, of course this is the enventuality of 3-D printing. (Dope slap to myself) If you were going to Mars and had a 3-D printer what plans would you bring to print? Trick question: They will send you all the plans you need via CAD files on the earth net!!! Do environmental impacts (LCA) of buildings in the future now have to consider impacts of the building on the universe!?   ;-} More at http://www.greenbuildingsolutions.org 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D printing: a replicator, perhaps?
Ann R. Thryft   9/18/2012 12:00:11 PM
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William, that's Contour Crafting making buildings with dirt and similar materials. And here's another AM manufacturer that wants to make buildings with a 3D printer, called D-Shape: http://www.d-shape.com/cose.htm

William K.
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Re: 3D printing: a replicator, perhaps?
William K.   9/17/2012 10:03:45 PM
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A 3D printer that could use soil or "dirt" would be more amazing than the basic concept of a 3D printer! FRom the descriptions of how the various ones work, it is a challenge to imagine using dirt as a feedstock. So if any details on that sort of system become available they would be real news.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: Concerns about extreme Cold
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   9/17/2012 2:29:36 PM
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Yes, Ann; you and I have discussed several times previously the history of Rapid Proto methods, especially going way back to 3D Systems' first SLAs in the late 1980's.  But I am new to SLS prototyping (just this year) and have been Very Impressed with this material's robustness as a prototype; you can get parts just as fast as conventional SLA, but the material properties are astoundingly better.  I still have a lot to learn about them, but as I discovered, this SLS is TOUGH STUFF!

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 3D printing: a replicator, perhaps?
Ann R. Thryft   9/17/2012 12:15:53 PM
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William, I think those are very good points: power and material sources. However, in the case of Contour Crafting, it's designed to use naturally occurring materials, such as various forms of soil. The power concerns, however, remain.

TJ McDermott
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Making space commonplace
TJ McDermott   9/16/2012 11:29:08 PM
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How will the astronauts demonstrate their creativity if tools can be printed, instead of being jury-rigged from tape and spare manuals?

Seriously, this could save a mission in the "...for lack of a nail..." sense.

Contour Crafting Robot is the first of the large-format 3D printers.

 

William K.
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3D printing: a replicator, perhaps?
William K.   9/16/2012 3:02:21 PM
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Shades of Star Trek and the ever present replicators, that usually produced food ready to eat. I do have some concerns about where the feed material, with it's fairly demanding characteristics, comes from. Of course, native soil on the moon and on Mars may have properties that make it suitable for the process, but they might not.  And draqgging along the raw materials will be as heavy as bringing finished parts. MY other concern is about where the energy to fuse the powder into objects will come from. Deveoping enough heat to fuse materials does take a fair amount of heat.and that power needs to come from some place. So the additive manufacturing machine in space has some real challenges ahead for it. On earth, of course, the situation is totally different, except the question of where the materials come from is still to be answered. Possibly some version that uses course feedstock will be invented.

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