HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
REGISTER   |   LOGIN   |   HELP
Blogs
Engineering Materials

Flexible Batteries Power Flexible Displays

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
very cool
NadineJ   8/28/2012 11:29:47 AM
NO RATINGS
The first time I saw a  flexible display at CES, I was awed.  I couldn't imagaine what could come next. 

I'm curious to see the thin-film transistors when they're ready.  Thanks for the article.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: very cool
Ann R. Thryft   8/28/2012 12:24:20 PM
NO RATINGS
Nadine, I admit that I have a tough time believing flexible displays can work. They seem so counterintuitive, yet there are several development efforts going on to produce them.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: very cool
Rob Spiegel   8/28/2012 4:56:27 PM
NO RATINGS
It's going to be interesting to see what applications come from this. The flexible displays I've seen are fun, but I haven't seen them in a setting where flexibility was a necessity rather than a nice gimmick. Yet I'm sure somebody will come up with a great idea once this technology is available.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: very cool
Charles Murray   8/28/2012 5:18:08 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm sure that engineers will find many applications for thin film batteries and displays. I can remember when people claimed the only application for PCs was to store recipes. We've found some new apps since then.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: very cool
Nancy Golden   8/28/2012 5:19:21 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree, Rob. I have a feeling a few years from now they will be in the technology domain in products that we don't even give a second thought to as being out of the ordinary...kind of like the evolution of LED flashlights.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: very cool
NadineJ   8/28/2012 5:32:55 PM
NO RATINGS
One idea did come to me while reading through the comments.   I can see this used for tablets aimed at the kid's market.  I never imagined that a $400 item could be popular for children.  If you've ever watched two toddlers arguing over an ipad, you know what I mean.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: very cool
Rob Spiegel   8/29/2012 10:31:25 AM
NO RATINGS
Good point, Chuck. We're likely to be surprised by what shows up now that this flexible technology is becoming available. It didn't take long for applications to show up for the PC. Smart phones are another good example. Using the phone to make a call almost seems an afterthought for young users.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: very cool
Rob Spiegel   8/29/2012 11:02:17 AM
NO RATINGS
I agree, Nadine. Tiny kids take to tablets in a remarkable way. In a family, the kids take over the tablets in ways they never tried to do with desktops or laptops. Flexible computers will be perfect for kid applications.

wbswenberg
User Rank
Gold
Plastic Batteries
wbswenberg   8/29/2012 11:22:47 AM
NO RATINGS
I can remember reading about two potential plastic battery technologies more than a decade ago.  I'm not talking about using plastic as an armature.  There were two developments; one was more like a cap for charge storage; the other was like an organic plastic.  I can also remember about film batteries which was more like plastic armature with the media deposited on the plastic film.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: very cool
Ann R. Thryft   8/29/2012 12:04:05 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, Chuck, just a few apps since then :) For flexible displays, the apps I see mentioned most often are watches and other wearable computers, medical devices, and signage. I think Nancy's right: once the tech is available, they will be all over the place and we'll wonder how we ever did without them.

Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Engineering Materials
NASA and Boeing developed a huge, carbon composite cryogenic fuel tank for deep space missions, and started testing it last month. The 18-ft cryotank will enable heavy-lift launch vehicles to send both humans and robots into deep space.
German engineering firm EDAG Group showed a single-piece, 3D-printed car body design inspired by a turtle at the Geneva Motor Show. It came about after an assessment of how additive manufacturing could be applied to making industrial components, modules, and complete vehicle bodies.
Stratasys is buying assets of a key player in materials testing and R&D for its FDM filament printers, and there's a new polypropylene material for the PolyJet series of 3D printers.
3D printing has met up with drones in a 3D-printed UAV. University of Sheffield engineers printed the prototype drone in 24 hours from ABS plastic using Fused Deposition Modeling.
Some of the biggest self-assembled building blocks and structures made from engineered DNA have been developed by researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute. The largest, a hexagonal prism, is one-tenth the size of an average bacterium.
Design News Webinar Series
3/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
2/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
12/18/2013 Available On Demand
11/20/2013 Available On Demand
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 21 - 25, Creating & Testing Your First RTOS Application Using MQX
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: April 29 - Day 1
Sponsored by maxon precision motors
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service