HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Engineering Materials
Long-Range EV Has Motors in its Wheels
8/23/2012

< Previous   Image 2 of 2   

The key material in the SIM-WIL's in-wheel motors, DuPont's Zytel HTN polyphthalamide (PPA), is used in the motor bobbins shown here. The material is stronger, lighter, and more cost-effective than what it replaces. (Source: DuPont Performance Polymers)
The key material in the SIM-WIL's in-wheel motors, DuPont's Zytel HTN polyphthalamide (PPA), is used in the motor bobbins shown here. The material is stronger, lighter, and more cost-effective than what it replaces.
(Source: DuPont Performance Polymers)

< Previous   Image 2 of 2   

Return to Article

View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Page 1/8  >  >>
Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Novel design approach
Beth Stackpole   8/23/2012 8:21:44 AM
NO RATINGS
This seems like a great example of engineers thinking out of the box. Maybe I dont' know enough about the space, but putting motors in wheels as a means of increasing mobility on a single charge seems pretty unique--and compelling. Is any one aware of others using this as a mainstream approach?

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Novel design approach
naperlou   8/23/2012 8:48:11 AM
NO RATINGS
Beth, acutally this is the way electric cars should be designed.  Having one big electric motor is really a legacy of the ICE design philosophy.  Of course, it made sense there.  I always assumed that this is how electric cars would be designed, and I believe that over the years there have been such prototypes or design studies.  Locomotives, for example, the real model for how we should be designing electric and hybrid vehicles, use a motor for each driven axle.  Of course, becuase they run on rails they don't need one for each wheel.  In the conventional vehicle world, companies like Audi have long touted all wheel drive, where power is feed to each wheel in an optimum way.  With modern control systems and, of course, innovations in the motors themselves, this should be a no brainer for the modern electric or hybrid vehicle.

Scott Orlosky
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Novel design approach
Scott Orlosky   8/23/2012 10:05:30 AM
NO RATINGS
I have to say, that I have heard of this design approach before (motors in wheels) but not sure if it was ever on a vehicle intended for production.  Makes perfect sense, though.  No more drive shaft tunnel or heavy gearbox and differential.  I'll bet it's low maintenance as well.  Total cost of ownership/operation is probably pretty good when compared to gasoline and hybrid models.

 

Bunter
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Novel design approach
Bunter   8/23/2012 10:11:14 AM
Hi Lou,

While I would agree that there is indeed some ICE legacy to the single motor design direction there are other considerations.

Placing the motors in the wheels increases the unsprung mass of the vehicle and this has an adverse effect on the performance of the suspension.  Typically both ride and handling charateristics deteriorate when the ratio of unsprung to sprung mass increases.  For the locomotives in your example, traveling on a smooth rail this is farless of an issue.

One possiblity is placing the motor very near the wheel with a short drive shaft.  Yes the complexity of the sytem increases, but it may still be better than the centrally located motor without the drawbacks of placing the mass outboard of the suspension.

Just some thoughts.

Dennis

abq-engineer
User Rank
Iron
Re: Novel design approach
abq-engineer   8/23/2012 10:48:24 AM
NO RATINGS
beth,

"nothing new under the sun"

check out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lohner-Porsche

this car sold from 1900-1905!

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Novel design approach
Ann R. Thryft   8/23/2012 3:02:50 PM
NO RATINGS
abq-engineer, thanks for that link. What fun! It sounds like a very similar design concept to the SIM-WIL. Of course, as the article points out, it weighed a lot because of the 1.8 tonnes (metric tons, or 1.984 US short tons) of batteries needed.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Novel design approach
Rob Spiegel   8/23/2012 5:32:40 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, I have a feeling we'll look back at this period as an explosion of innovation in the auto industry. I would guess a lot of the technology that's getting developed to support hybrids and EVs will also be handy when used to meet the higher mpg standards in conventional autos.

Chuck_IAG
User Rank
Platinum
Plastic body
Chuck_IAG   8/23/2012 6:04:02 PM
NO RATINGS
Thinking about this, the idea of a plastic body for a car with hundreds of watt of energy flowing through it is very smart.  I've shocked myself touching the body of a normal auto when static electricity had built up, and it was not fun.  Amplify that by a factor of, oh, maybe 200 to 400, and wow! the advantage of using non-conductive parts begins to sound really intelligent.  So I'm all in favor of it.

The unsprung weight of the car due to motors in the wheels would certainly reduce its handling capability.  And I'd sure hate to hit a big pothole; you'd be out shopping for a new tire and wheel immediately, as soon as your teeth stopped rattling.

The range sounds almost too good- I wonder if it's anywhere near that far at freeway speeds.

But why do they insist on making these things look dorky?  Did someone pass a law against making them look like a Tesla?

greg
User Rank
Iron
Re: Plastic body
greg   8/23/2012 7:39:10 PM
NO RATINGS
according to Lotus, the unsprung weight consequences of hub electric motors is not as great as one would think. From Vehicle Dynamics International's 2011 Annual Showcase:

http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/5d2f4966#/5d2f4966/40

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Motor for more mileage
Mydesign   8/24/2012 3:00:13 AM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
Ann, one of the major drawbacks of any EV is its less mileage. So any innovation, which can increase the mileage, may get more appreciated from both market and customer side. But am not getting how its possible to deploy one- one motor for each wheel

Page 1/8  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Engineering Materials
In this second materials slideshow from NPE2015, we've got some plastics that vendors were showcasing, including products made with them, and others that were brand-new introductions at the show.
Instead of sifting through huge amounts of technical data looking for answers to assembly problems, engineers can now benefit from 3M's new initiative -- 3M Assembly Solutions. The company has organized its wealth of adhesive and tape solutions into six typical application areas, making it easier to find the best products to solve their real-world assembly and bonding problems.
Many of the materials in this slideshow are resins or elastomers, plus reinforced materials, styrenics, and PLA masterbatches. Applications range from automotive and aerospace to industrial, consumer electronics and wearables, consumer goods, medical and healthcare, as well as sporting goods, and materials for protecting food and beverages.
Engineers trying to keep track of the ever-ballooning number of materials and machines for additive manufacturing and 3D printing now have some relief: a free searchable database with more than 350 machines and 450 different materials.
At JEC Europe Dow Automotive introduced a new ultra-fast, under-60-second molding cycle time for its commercial-grade VORAFORCE 5300 epoxy resin matrix for carbon composites. It's aimed at high-volume automotive manufacturing.
Design News Webinar Series
3/31/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Mar 30 - Apr3, Getting Hands-On with Cypress’ PSoC
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service