HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Engineering Materials

Plastics, Adhesives & Coatings Miniaturize Products

NO RATINGS
1 saves
< Previous Page 2 / 4 Next >
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Swallowable endoscope
Ann R. Thryft   6/15/2012 1:18:45 PM
NO RATINGS
Some of the most interesting and fun applications I found during reporting this story were the small health monitoring devices. For example, you can see pictures of the Japanese swallowable endoscope in use, both outside and inside the body, here:
http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/articles/170187/20110627/japanese-scientists-invent-mermaid-tiny-remote-controlled-pill-camera-examine-digestive-tract.htm
and a video of one from the University of Washington here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AlQN3c04mu0

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Great support article
NadineJ   6/15/2012 6:42:01 PM
NO RATINGS
A few years ago, I wrote a trend report titled "Smaller, Faster, Better" highlighting not only nano and micro technologies but also a general sizing down across the board.  A striking number of experts dismissed it as irrelevant for the American market.  I love having articles like this that back up my trend reports with current information.  Thank you!


I'd love to see the process 3M and IBM are developing in action.  It sounds amazing.  It's good to see 3M in new areas.

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Swallowable endoscope
Tim   6/17/2012 7:58:25 AM
NO RATINGS
This endoscope is amazing technology. It reminds me of the movie Innerspace, but the difference is that the minature endoscope is real and not science fiction. Great and informative article.

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Smaller, Less Invasive
Greg M. Jung   6/17/2012 9:55:42 PM
NO RATINGS
Well said on the trend for smaller and less invasive procedures which help to reduce our health care costs in the long run.

Less invasive procedures produce less risk for the patient and result in safer and less costly procedures.

Smaller products result in the need for a smaller footprint which saves precious horizontal space (to keep overhead costs down) in the clinic.

senya
User Rank
Iron
Zio Patch
senya   6/18/2012 10:04:20 AM
NO RATINGS
I am wondering about iRhythm Technologies approach (page 2) to use 1 electrode to acquire ECG. For an electrical signal to exist (unless the device is catching electrons) 2 terminals must be provided. The picture itself shows 2 electrodes, or to make this claim accurate, it shows 2 electrically connected terminals

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Swallowable endoscope
Ann R. Thryft   6/18/2012 12:59:04 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks, Tim. Interestingly, the Japanese version is not the only swallowable endoscope. There are several different models. senya, thanks for catching that editing glitch--it should have said "one lead, not three." The Zio in fact uses two electrodes.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great support article
Ann R. Thryft   6/18/2012 1:00:23 PM
NO RATINGS
Nadine, you are welcome. Since "smaller, faster, better" is an ongoing trend cluster in electronics over the last several decades--both at the board level and the system level--I'm surprised that anyone would dismiss this idea. What about the American market was seen as unusual in this context?

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Great support article
NadineJ   6/18/2012 4:17:04 PM
NO RATINGS
Everyone seemed to recognize the concept for electronics easily.  I pointed out that their cell phones are more powerful than their first PCs.  But, they didn't get that it was also relevant for other areas such as autos, housing and urban-planning.  I pointed out the popularity of the Mini, not only as an efficient city car but as great unisex design.  It was dismissed as a fluke.

All you can do is stand by your work and wait for others to see it too.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great support article
Ann R. Thryft   6/19/2012 12:34:16 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for that clarification and context. I see what you mean. Autos certainly, but only to a point, since many Americans are taller/larger than people elsewhere. Housing I've also heard about, but smaller living spaces, except for seniors, generally does meet with a lot of resistance among American consumers. The one I don't get is urban planning: what aspect of that is or could get smaller?

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Great support article
NadineJ   6/19/2012 5:16:14 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann-for years moving to the suburbs was seen as a sign of upward mobility.  That lead to the ex-urbs and an increasing need for private-cars to commute to work or shopping centers.

Today, partly because of the sustainability movement, the city is popular again.  People want to live, work and shop within walking distance, or at least a short ride on public transit.  Urban planners have been consulting with trend forecasters lately to help them understand this new dynamic.  Neighbourhoods are coming back.

In autos, smaller cars like the Mini or Prius have a deceptive amount of interior space for those who need it vertically or horizontally.  Yet, they're shorter and, easier to park, than most sedans on the roads in the US.

Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Engineering Materials
Artificially created metamaterials are already appearing in niche applications like electronics, communications, and defense, says a new report from Lux Research. How quickly they become mainstream depends on cost-effective manufacturing methods, which will include additive manufacturing.
SpaceX has 3D printed and successfully hot-fired a SuperDraco engine chamber made of Inconel, a high-performance superalloy, using direct metal laser sintering (DMLS). The company's first 3D-printed rocket engine part, a main oxidizer valve body for the Falcon 9 rocket, launched in January and is now qualified on all Falcon 9 flights.
A new thermoplastic composite for high-speed, high-volume injection molding has tensile strength that's close to, and sometimes better than, either lay-up composites or metals.
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and MIT have 3D-printed a new class of metamaterials that are both exceptionally light and have exceptional strength and stiffness. The new metamaterials maintain a nearly constant stiffness per unit of mass density, over three orders of magnitude.
Smart composites that let the material's structural health be monitored automatically and continuously are getting closer to reality. R&D partners in an EU-sponsored project have demonstrated what they say is the first complete, miniaturized, fiber-optic sensor system entirely embedded inside a fiber-reinforced composite.
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 18 - 22, Embedded Software Development With Python & the Raspberry Pi
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service