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Engineering Materials

Self-Healing Plastic Changes Color When Damaged

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Self-healing plastics
Ann R. Thryft   5/7/2012 12:30:53 PM
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William, thanks for your comment. I agree with you about this not being likely for consumer-grade use. We addressed this issue earlier in the thread: since this is not close to commercial development yet, price and cost differentials are unknown. But self-healing plastics like this one--which unusually can self-heal multiple times--multiply the life of the object several times. Less plastic gets used during that time, so the COO to manufacturers would be lower than buying it once. It's not aimed at high-volume, low-cost throwaway applications, but ones where continued use of a high-value product is important, such as military or medical products.

William K.
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Self-healing plastics
William K.   5/5/2012 9:52:53 PM
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It would be quite useful to know some of the more common materials propertiies of this self healing material, such as strength, stiffness, and temperature ratings, and that all important property, PRICE. My guess is that it would never be found in consumer goods evenif the cost were half that of styrene regrind. It appears that many consumer goods have avery intentional low quality level, so that they would be replaced every few months.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Smart Plastic
Ann R. Thryft   5/3/2012 12:59:52 PM
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ChasChas, thanks for that comment. I agree with you. I've reported on several other experimental materials that seem to be moving toward intelligence, some of them via nanotechnology, and many of them based on shifts in electrical charge.


Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Smart Plastic
Ann R. Thryft   5/2/2012 12:51:27 PM
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Thanks Greg, that's a really good example of the type of application this could serve.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Smart Plastic
Ann R. Thryft   5/1/2012 2:13:59 PM
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Nadine, thanks for the clarification. Since this material is aimed at self-repairing surface damage, I don't think it's designed for implants. But that's an interesting idea. There are many biocompatible plastics made for that application, and designing one of those to be self-healing would be a good PhD project.

NadineJ
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Re: Smart Plastic
NadineJ   5/1/2012 2:01:32 PM
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Ann: I'm thinkiing specifically about joint replacement.  I had the honor to attend an orthopaedic surgeons conference a few months ago. The technology is very interesting and has been making slow advances, especially in hip replacements.  Even temperature and PH changes would be problematic for spine, knee and hip replacements.

But, it may cause less trauma than entirely replacing the unit.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Smart Plastic
Ann R. Thryft   5/1/2012 1:13:41 PM
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Mydesign, most countries are trying to find alternate feedstocks for plastics, like bioplastics, and/or design plastics that are compostable or recyclable, as I've written about here

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=239645

http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=239662

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=240409

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=241854

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=242634

Meanwhile, these new plastics are only a drop in the huge bucket of the amount of plastics we consume. So extending the life of non-recyclable, non-compostable plastics by reusing them helps keep them out of the landfill.


Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Smart Plastic
Ann R. Thryft   5/1/2012 1:12:39 PM
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Nadine, intense light is one possible exposure mechanism--the article also mentions changes in temperature or pH. I'm not sure why strong light would be a problem for an implant, since an implant is usually kept away from light. Can you tell us more about what you mean?


Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Plastics in need of healing?
Ann R. Thryft   5/1/2012 1:06:02 PM
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Chuck, the types of damage mentioned were all surface types, such as cuts, cracks and scratches. This is not aimed at repairing structural damage.

ChasChas
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Re: Smart Plastic
ChasChas   5/1/2012 10:03:07 AM
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I don't think this is just about plactic. This looks like a venture into "intelligent material" in general.

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