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Engineering Materials

Tiny Robots Fly in Swarms

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Crichton did it already...
Ann R. Thryft   5/14/2012 1:05:25 PM
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Jack, most of the swarming and flying robots, along with a lot of other robot research, seem to be funded by the military, usually DARPA. The one I mentioned also appears to be aimed at military applications.

Jack Rupert, PE
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Re: Crichton did it already...
Jack Rupert, PE   5/12/2012 7:08:28 PM
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I look forward to reading about it Ann.  I imagine that that design is primarily for military and/or law enforcement applications?

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: robotic shriners
Ann R. Thryft   5/11/2012 12:49:42 PM
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Warren, I hear you. The huge advances in semiconductor shrinks and system-on-chip have made processors and memory capable of such feats, as well as big reductions in sensor size and rise in abilities because of MEMS technology.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Crichton did it already...
Ann R. Thryft   5/11/2012 12:48:36 PM
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Jack, wait 'til you see the much smaller flying bug in an upcoming robot slideshow: it's about the size of a quarter. I think that one will fit under the door. Not only that, but these are self-assembling: shades of Crichton!

warren@fourward.com
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Re: robotic shriners
warren@fourward.com   5/10/2012 2:02:16 PM
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It's funny how we used to think about how much memory it would take for such a task and know it was totally unrealistic.  Now, it is reality.  We have the memory and processing power.  Now we just have to work out the "bugs."

warren@fourward.com
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Re: Crichton did it already...
warren@fourward.com   5/10/2012 1:58:46 PM
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You do know that was just a movie and not real?  :-)

Charles Murray
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Re: Crichton did it already...
Charles Murray   3/16/2012 7:29:48 PM
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Jack: Didn't the robots do something similar in iRobot? I seem to remember a scene where "robotic spiders" snuck under a door to look for a criminal suspect.

Jack Rupert, PE
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Re: Crichton did it already...
Jack Rupert, PE   3/11/2012 2:55:15 PM
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Oldtimer8080 - I was thinking the same thing when I started reading the article.  Happily, these robots aren't small enough to sneak under doors...YET!

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: robotic shriners
Ann R. Thryft   3/8/2012 4:07:55 PM
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The robots use some kind of continuously adjusted mapping functions to locate themselves in space and explore unknown environments, as Kumar states in the TED talk video:

http://www.ted.com/talks/vijay_kumar_robots_that_fly_and_cooperate.html I don't know if that technology is based on SLAM (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping), but I wouldn't be surprised. It's pretty popular for this type of application.

BTW, the robots in the story are the same robots from the U of PA GRASP Lab that play the James Bond theme in that video.


Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Crichton did it already...
Ann R. Thryft   3/6/2012 12:51:04 PM
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Hey, oldtimer8080, I did read PREY. It was very scary. In fact, I thought of that book when I saw the first video on these little robots, although I think they are also cool. I hadn't thought about the invasion of private property issues, good point. Your 'tude sounds like the 'tude of many of my neighbors up here in the mountains. 


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