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iPad Controls Flying Video Game

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Beth Stackpole
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Toy or technology platform?
Beth Stackpole   2/9/2012 6:34:29 AM
You're absolutely right Ann: I bet a lot of engineers are going to be drooling over this robot and the opportunity to figure out how it works and to extend it. Is this designed to be a toy or is just to showcase technology that has broader potential--perhaps for some of the applications you mentioned?

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Toy or technology platform?
Rob Spiegel   2/9/2012 11:38:07 AM
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This is cool, Ann. I would imagine we'll see a proliferation of this -- going downmarket for inexpensive toys for kids and going upmarket for the adult hobbyists who go out to parks on Saturday mornings with their radio-operated planes.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Toy or technology platform?
Ann R. Thryft   2/9/2012 12:51:04 PM
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Beth, the Parrot appears to be designed as a (very sophisticated) toy, although I doubt the gamers would call it that. Most of the videos show teens using it, but as Rob points out, many adults play with these, too. The elements of the technology itself have been showcased with way better hardware elsewhere, including the Japanese flying sphere, or various military drone prototypes. OTOH, because it's open platform, users are encouraged to design and build their own. It's me looking at it with my would-be engineer's mentality and industrial machine vision reporting experience thinking: How is this put together? What would happen if I changed this and tweaked that? that makes me think about other applications like military and industrial MV. I assume engineers will be, too.


Charles Murray
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Re: Toy or technology platform?
Charles Murray   2/9/2012 4:36:22 PM
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Ann, could this be used by soldiers checking out dangerous locales? I know that many small drones are used in war zones, and I believe that Lockheed-Martin just introduced one in the past few days.

apresher
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Only 12 Minutes
apresher   2/10/2012 8:20:13 AM
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Ann,  This is a very cool design and represents an interesting piece of technology. The 12 minute limitation on flying time does represent a bit of a downer, even though you can see why it's true.  I assume the batteries are easily accessible and can be replaced to keep the fun times rolling.

JPW
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Nano Drone use
JPW   2/10/2012 9:25:58 AM
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I personally see an opportunity to put nano-drones to use in the Florida everglades. I envision swarms of nano-drones mounted with one sensor device capable of seeking out Burmese Pythons and one poison dart capable of delivering said Pythons a lethal dose.

Sounds Matrixy, but desperate situations call for outside of the box sci-fi thinking.

Otherwise, surprised that no one has started a snake canning/packing company to sell to Asia and other markets where snake meat is popular.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Toy or technology platform?
Ann R. Thryft   2/10/2012 12:28:32 PM
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Yes, that's the sort of military drone app I had in mind when I saw the AR.Drone game platform (I've been calling it the Parrot because that's the maker's name and it kind of looks like one to me). Thanks for the info about Lockheed-Martin. I checked it out and found this reference (with video) to the Samarai, a small, spinning surveillance drone with a 360-degree view:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/technology/technology-video/video-spinning-surveillance-drone-inspired-by-maple-key/article2329232/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Technology&utm_content=2329232

Is this the one you had in mind? It looks highly targeted to a surveillance app. But I'd be surprised if military developers aren't paying attention to potential inspiration in the consumer sector, such as the AR.Drone. 


Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Only 12 Minutes
Ann R. Thryft   2/10/2012 12:29:51 PM
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Al, the 12-minute flying time limit of the batteries is one of the various characteristics that screams "toy" about this design. But battery use and type, like other performance specs, can be altered by changes in both hardware and software. 

I think JPW's nano-drone concept is interesting, although I would not have thought of using them as a device for snake seek-and-destroy missions. Sounds like you've got quite a problem over there! Hmmm, maybe I could use them out here for skunks, which can be quite a pest this time of year.

 

 

Charles Murray
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Re: Toy or technology platform?
Charles Murray   2/10/2012 12:53:35 PM
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That's a great video, Ann. Yes, the Samarai is the one I had in mind. Your point about the consumer sector is well taken, however. Often the consumer sector finds ways to accomplish similar things on a shoestring budget.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Toy or technology platform?
Ann R. Thryft   2/10/2012 1:12:48 PM
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OK, thought it must be the Samarai from your description. But this is so simple kids could have designed it; it's much less complex than the AR.Drone or the Japanese flying sphere, or even other stuff the military has done along these lines. Maybe the military needs to start hiring teenagers for their design team...


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