HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Engineering Materials

Bridge Made From Recycled Plastic Bottles

NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 2 Next >
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/3  >  >>
Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Impressive accomplishment
Ann R. Thryft   1/11/2012 12:54:51 PM
NO RATINGS

If the materials are the least expensive installed cost, don't require maintenance like steel, and last longer because they are impervious to rot, chemicals, etc, then it looks to me like the total cost of ownership would be lower than steel. If the materials cost is the same as steel, or even somewhat higher, this lower COO is likely to offset that cost. The simple fact that the Army is paying for it tells me this is highly likely.

I'd be surprised if it's impervious to fire--I don't know any plastic that is.

Does anyone know of one?


plasticlumberman
User Rank
Iron
Impressive accomplishment
plasticlumberman   1/11/2012 8:37:57 AM
NO RATINGS
The Army spokesman claims these materials are the least expensive installed cost in the video.

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Impressive materials
Tim   1/10/2012 7:44:24 PM
NO RATINGS
This is a great use of recycled material. A major portion of steel bridge maintenance is the on-going sandblast / paint cycle. Using plastic for the bridge span is great. Using recycled plastic is even better.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Impressive materials
Rob Spiegel   1/10/2012 1:19:24 PM
NO RATINGS
Good story, Ann. I'm impressed. It's one thing to fill a car seat with this material, but a weight-bearing bridge is quite something else. It pretty much takes the ceiling off for this material. Imagine, infrastructure made from landfill material. Now I don't feel so bad about drinking bottled water.

RadioGuy
User Rank
Gold
Re: Impressive accomplishment
RadioGuy   1/10/2012 1:12:24 PM
NO RATINGS
>> Trash to steam did not work

 

Could you clarify that a bit ?

All over Europe, energy is recovered by incinerating trash, generating steam for heating apartment complexes in towns and cities and/or generating electricity. This works very well, greatly reducing the volume of material that needs to be buried in landfills.


plasticlumberman
User Rank
Iron
Re: Impressive accomplishment
plasticlumberman   1/10/2012 12:37:23 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi Ann,

 

These materials have higher specific strength than mild steel, and we have a handle on the most important issue for thermoplastics- the creep issue. 

 

As for cost, I'll let other speak. The Army has just completed a full 2 year constant study of the first takn bridge at Bargg, and came through perfectly. Listen to the video on the tank bridge opening ceremony very carefully. He says 3 important things- one referring to maintenance, one referring to degradation, and one referring to a ROI. 

 

Regards,

 

The Inventor.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Impressive accomplishment
Ann R. Thryft   1/10/2012 12:28:09 PM
NO RATINGS

Chuck, there's some detailed spec info on Axion's website:

http://www.axionintl.com/library.html

I, too was quite surprised that this stuff is strong enough to hold up railroad trains and Army tanks.

kenish, the manufacturer claims that it's chemically impervious to practically everything. Again the Technical Library may answer your questions.

plasticlumberman, thanks so much for sharing your experience and the videos. You signed yourself "the inventor"--does that mean you are Tom Nosker?

Also, can you tell us anything about the cost/price differentials?

 


plasticlumberman
User Rank
Iron
Re: Impressive accomplishment
plasticlumberman   1/10/2012 12:05:12 PM
NO RATINGS
Thank you for the nice article. These materials are quite different from Trex in many regards, and this is recyclable after the end of life. As for static/Dynamic considerations, the tank bridges were designed to have a tank parked on the bridge for 25 years and then drive off and have the bridge recover its' shape. The Scotland bridge was a more modest 10 year loading.

 

I recommend a couple of videos to those interested:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hE-ymdio44

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dD3ml_t77Y

 

Regards,

 

The Inventor.

OLD_CURMUDGEON
User Rank
Platinum
MORE QUESTIONS.....
OLD_CURMUDGEON   1/10/2012 10:37:23 AM
NO RATINGS
The reference to the M1 ABRAMS tank crossing a bridge @ Ft. Bragg begs the question regarding static & dynamic loads.  Was the tank in motion or sitting mid-span?  If in motion, the calculations for acceptable load vs. deflection take on a different posture than if the tank was sitting mid-span w/ engine running while the summer sun baked down on the bridge structure.  While I'm convinced that the designers did their "homework" regarding allowable loads, did they also consider ambient temperature and/or chemical decomposition from UV rays, etc.?  The installation of a short-span bridge in Scotland, which see much cooler average temperatures & wetter climate conditions than many parts of the U.S. etc. also should be a factor in determining suitability of installation.  The initial cost of installation should not be high on the list of priorities, given the elimination of periodic maintenance, especially in light of the fact that maintenance costs are not fixed over time.  It would seem to me that they are probably more exponential in nature.

burntpuppy
User Rank
Silver
fire and cold fracture risks
burntpuppy   1/10/2012 9:49:53 AM
NO RATINGS
I wonder about the fire risk? With bush fires and forrest fire becoming more common plastic bridges seems a bit scary. That is also ignoring fires caused by a motor vehicle accident.

I wonder what the cold temperature behaviour is like?

<<  <  Page 2/3  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Engineering Materials
At IMTS last week, Stratasys introduced two new multi-materials PolyJet 3D printers, plus a new UV-resistant material for its FDM production 3D printers. They can be used in making jigs and fixtures, as well as prototypes and small runs of production parts.
GE Aviation not only plans to use 3D printing to mass-produce metal parts for its LEAP jet engine, but it's also developing a separate technology for 3D-printing metal parts used in its other engines.
The demand for solar energy around the world will grow a total of 75% by 2019, according to a new report by Lux Research. Trade disputes and policy changes, though, will complicate the picture.
Bayer MaterialScience is using CO2 to produce a precursor for high-quality polyurethane foam at its pilot plant in Leverkusen. The transition to full-scale manufacturing is expected in 2016.
Plastic bags can become useful as either raw materials for plastics or feedstock for fuel. It's when they're not recycled that they become a major problem. That's what California's bag ban will prevent.
Design News Webinar Series
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 22 - 26, MCU Software Development A Step-by-Step Guide (Using a Real Eval Board)
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service