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Engineering Materials
3D Printing Accelerates Prototyping
9/29/2011

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Cisco engineers say their goal is to make networking products such as the wireless router   simple and beautiful, as well as functional.
Cisco engineers say their goal is to make networking products such as the wireless router
simple and beautiful, as well as functional.

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ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Faster necessarily better?
ChasChas   3/22/2012 10:53:57 AM
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Creativedesign, I hear you.

However,

Thomas Edison, probably the most polific inventor, found over a 1000 ways how NOT to make a light bulb. Working day and night to eliminate the wrong guesses, he finally succeeded.

Cheaper/Faster 3D printers aught to help with the 99% prespiration he talks about.

Artists are different - the journey is more important/fun than getting to the destination.

creativedesign
User Rank
Iron
Faster necessarily better?
creativedesign   10/4/2011 10:57:45 PM
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Every RP article implies that faster design processes are better. Here the author even argues that more iterations leads to better outcomes. This may sound obvious, but anyone involved in design will tell you: faster doesn't always mean better. Here is a hint: it really depends on the design methods that you use and how far in the decision making process you are. Sadly, the last 10 yrs have shown me that most RP are not actual improvements to the quality and originality of products. Some times faster just means faster, and this only means producing crap designs faster than before.

ronan.ye
User Rank
Iron
Re: 3D printing at work
ronan.ye   9/30/2011 9:27:59 AM
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I don't think Object and Zcop material is recycled. the tolerance you are talking about sounds crazy. 1/250 inch look more reasonable.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 3D printing at work
Beth Stackpole   9/30/2011 7:14:31 AM
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Thanks for raising the issue, SoCalPE, and thanks Jason, for the link to a resource for suggestions on plastic part disposal. I'm sure we'll be hearing a lot more people raising concerns about this issue as 3D printer use becomes more prevelant and as more organizations more widely integrate the technology as part of their prototyping and product development workflows.

Jason
User Rank
Gold
Re: 3D printing at work
Jason   9/29/2011 5:21:18 PM
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Fortunately it appears as though more and more people are thinking of the issue and are starting to come up with solutions.

 

http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=recycling+3d+printer

 

On i.materialize, the first search result from above, they lay out 4 possible solutions.  While they may not work for everyone and every 3D printer, they are atleast bringing some interesting and valid means or reusing unwanted printed objects.

SoCalPE
User Rank
Gold
Re: 3D printing at work
SoCalPE   9/29/2011 3:38:47 PM
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Beth, thanks for corroborating my concerns about recycling 3d printed parts.  Yes, that photo with the caption "... generate a mountain of throwaway prototypes..." is concerning in our society's semi-enlightened path of renewal ability and recycling.  I'm an avid fan and user of FDM 3d printing for prototype parts.  To my knowledge, SLA material cannot be recycled unlike 3d printers that extrude ABS (which we recycle after the parts are tested).  I'm not sure about Objet or ZCorp parts.  Doug, can you speak to this?

P.S. Tape Wrangler tolerances of some parts are 1/250,000 of an inch.  Really??? 


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
3D printing at work
Beth Stackpole   9/29/2011 11:44:42 AM
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Great working examples of how 3D printers are being used in companies to faciliate design and as a more cost-effective means of prototyping.

Seeing that image of all of those plastic, 3D printed parts, though, makes me think about disposal issues related to all this content that will be generated. A reader raised that issue in a comments on another 3D printer story and that image really brings the concern to light.

 

 

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